Fishing for dinner... Tips and tricks

Monster

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Joined
Apr 6, 2008
Messages
276
Location
Vancouver
Astoriadave said:
Monster: That brochure I linked is worth a closer read, I suspect. They indicate that even groundfish with distended stomachs (I thought that was the gas bladder, but it is not) and distended eyes can survive, with data showing at least some of them surviving a year plus later.
Ok, I see that this point is made in the brochure after a second read but, I think almost every time I've brought up a small one from too deep and had it's eyes bulged, it became a floater upon immediate release.

I see though that the brochure refers to releasing them properly by getting them back down to a depth where they can recover quickly, it's good advice and something I would be willing to try, possibly using a weighted crab trap. On the other hand, I've always as a general rule just kept these smaller fish for the campfire. Perhaps it's just me but, just like wild game, the younger ones seem to be more tender and tasty.
 

wannabeaduck

Paddler
Joined
Mar 9, 2010
Messages
25
Re:

DarrenM said:
yum!!


2 lbs of firm, fresh red snapper fillets, cut into 1/2 inch pieces, completely deboned
1/2 cup of fresh squeezed lime juice
1/2 cup of fresh squeezed lemon juice
1/2 purple onion, finely diced
1 cup of fresh peeled, seeded, and chopped tomatoes
1 serrano chili, seeded and finely diced
2 teaspoons of salt
dash of ground oregano
dash of Tabasco or a few grains of cayenne pepper

Cilantro
Avocado
Tortillas or tortilla chips
Method

1 In a non-reactive casserole dish, either Pyrex or ceramic, place the fish, onion, tomatoes, chili, salt, Tabasco, and oregano. Cover with lime and lemon juice. Let sit covered in the refrigerator for an hour, then stir, making sure more of the fish gets exposed to the acidic lime and lemon juices. Let sit for several hours, giving time for the flavors to blend.

2 Serve with chopped cilantro and slices of avocado with heated tortillas for ceviche tacos or with tortilla chips.

Is this being cooked in any way?
 

Stumpy

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Joined
Mar 13, 2008
Messages
531
Location
staten island, new york
ONE serrano :shock: ???? WIMP! Where's the habaneros?? :twisted:

I love my ceviche, but I've been known to over do the chilis at times. Blue corn tortillas make it pop, too, when you can find them
 

wannabeaduck

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Joined
Mar 9, 2010
Messages
25
Okies. Here I thought I was getting into that Sushi thing. I kinda think Sushi wouldn't be bad if it were cooked. (grin)

So I have done some research since then on www.allrecipes.com a food website I frequent when I am hungry. Apparently you can "cook" all kinds of seafood this way. MUCH to my surprise! I had no idea that it was a method of "cooking" at all. It does look interesting, and is something I will have to try at some point.

I am unfortunately one of those lily-livered panty-waisted people who faint at the very sight of any kind of chili or strong spice of any type. So it seems like I am gonna be eating my mildly spiced meals while the rest of you are scarfing down the yummy meals.

My upstairs neighbor gave me a taste of some of his Thai cooking, and I was stunned at the flavors. SO yummy! Unfortunately the aftereffect took 3 days to wear off. That would have been 3 days of wearing burning diapers had I been kayaking. What was a 6 on a scale 1 to 10 of spicy to me was only a 2 to him and his roommate. If we could have gotten rid of the searing heat of the chilies, and kept the rest of the flavors, I would have been thrilled to keep on scarfing that down.

Anyhow I will have to keep on looking at the fishing thing for dinner.

Down the road when things are better for me, I might look into getting myself an Ocean Kayak Trident Prowler 13 and going fishing. My Delta 17 is not quite as conducive to fishing, but I am looking at the hand line thing for trips.

Thanks for the info.
 

Rrdstarr

Paddler
Joined
Aug 7, 2009
Messages
504
Location
Victoria, BC Canada
I spent most of my summer catching Greenlings around the Victoria Area. Even managed to catch a Sockeye of Sooke basin this summer too! I am fishing in 15-30' down for the greenlings, cod and bass. I was down at 90' for the Sockeye using a 6lb down-rigger, flasher and a Sardine as bait. Fishing Buddy and I drop off our Crab traps on the way out and fish for three to four hours and take home Rock or Dungenous Crabs for dinner if we get skunked!
 

Chris_Hvid

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Joined
Jul 7, 2006
Messages
120
Location
Victoria, British Columbia since 1955
I had good luck kayak fishing for Chinook this summer with my SOT, with a 25lb at Rugged Point, and a 17lb off Sheringham Point. Lately I've been using a 4.0 Coyote spoon trolled behind a flasher, with 48 inches of leader. The gold coloured Watermelon pattern is excellent, as the spots on it emulate a pilchard, which is a common BC food fish for salmon. Chinooks like a nice long leader, as they are more easily spooked than coho or pinks. Two knots is fine for trolling, you don't need to go super fast.
 

Mark_Schilling

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Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
4,552
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"Home by the Sea" - Nanaimo, BC
Hmmm... good to know. I've done a bit of trolling with a dodger and hoochies or Coyote 5.0 spoon in the past, but trolling with all that drag (not to mention at least a 16oz weight to keep it all down there) is tough work if you're also trying to keep the boat straight and the rod on the deck. So, for the time being at least, I've changed focus slightly. I managed to catch countless rock fish (greenling, yelloweye etc.) on the West Coast this summer, with a buzz bomb - they were the easy ones. I also got a couple of salmon on the same buzz bombs, but they didn't stick around for the landing part of the show, nor did the two halibut (perhaps I'm slightly thankful for that... although after dragging one of them, definitely over 50 lbs, around for 3 hours while looking for somewhere away from surf and kelp to land and try to get it ashore, I wish I had!). I'm thinking of heading out again this afternoon, this time just from Neck Point or somewhere nearby in Nanaimo. I probably won't have it all set up in time, but I'm making a sort of flying gaff with wooden handle combo that I hope will help me land some of the bigger stuff in the future (I'll also make a hog-tie setup in case I'm able to get another halibut - they were amazingly easy to catch out in Kyuquot!).

Here's a very quick underwater snapshot I took of the smaller of the two halibut - I didn't want my hand anywhere near the water when the second one (which was quite a lot larger) was near my boat, especially hearing about how dangerous they can be when thrashing around near the surface (although they feel like you're dragging a huge cement block to the surface when you're 'playing' them - not too lively til they need to be, I guess!).
 

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Chris_Hvid

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Jul 7, 2006
Messages
120
Location
Victoria, British Columbia since 1955
Yumm...some nice fish and chips there. You are right that it does take some work to drag that gear around, and it really is necessary to have a rudder to offset the drag on the one side of the boat. I think I'd be too scared to bring in a big hali myself.
 

justincdst

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Aug 3, 2012
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51
Location
48.383 -123.733
That's it, Im gonna make something up this weekend for a hand reel and go hope for the best! What test line and tackle do you recommend for around Sooke/Jordan River area in and around the reefs?
 

SheilaP

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Joined
Jun 6, 2007
Messages
1,012
Location
Victoria, BC
justincdst said:
That's it, Im gonna make something up this weekend for a hand reel and go hope for the best! What test line and tackle do you recommend for around Sooke/Jordan River area in and around the reefs?
I recommend going to a local store and asking what is working this season. Usually highly educational and usually entertaining too. :mrgreen: This is what I do what I need tackle and I have lots of luck. I use a handline too.
 

SheilaP

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Jun 6, 2007
Messages
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Location
Victoria, BC
justincdst said:
Thanks SheilaP, do you use a net at all or just wrestled your catch onto the deck, Im curious, this sounds like a lot of fun!
I use REALLY long fishing pliers that are tied to the deck with a few feet of rope. If the fish is too small, I leave it in the water and grab the hook with the pliers. Then I twist up and the fish releases (must be sure to have non-barbded hooks!). If the fish is big enough, I drag the fish up on the side it is on with the opposite hand. E.g. right hand catch means the pliers are in my left hand. I lay the fish on my deck (or greenland paddle that is there) and whack it with my pump. :lol: :lol: :lol: Then I place the fish in a heavy duty dry bag that is rolled up on deck and slide it into my cockpit or under bungies with a clip if it is rough.

Disclaimer: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: This system was invented by mistake and necessity. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: Activities associated with the kayak fishing and a handline can at times involve substantial risk of injury, kayak damage, and other dangers associated with participation in the event.

I would also STRONGLY recommend bringing a friend, or new kayaking pal, along when you try this sport. The first time I caught something big I was dragged across a busy channel full of power boats. Fortunately their laughter slowed them down enough not to hit me. I have had some very tippy moments as well! I usually prefer a buddy system where someone can come along and assist or stabilize the boat if need be.

I found that the key is to have a system, that works for you, let it evolve, but stick to something. I get very excited when I catch a good one, and it would NOT be hard for things to go very wrong. :big_thumb

Note - I use 40 pound test. I also have a few handlines with different lengths of line so I don't fish too deep when I am on my own. I should put up a pic of my $5.00 model.

Your GPS coordinates suggest you live close to me. If you ever want a fishing buddy, I'm game. :yikes:
 

Astoriadave

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Joined
May 31, 2005
Messages
5,625
Location
Astoria, Oregon, USA
No way am I as dedicated a kayak fisher as Sheila, but her pliers-based fish handling techniques are close to mine except for two things. I use a thick walled rubber glove to wrassle the fish, and stringer it in lieu of bashing and storing it. The stringer goes on deck, but sometimes slips into the water. This works for short fishing jaunts, but is not OK if I have to paddle a long ways to camp. Too much drag if the fish is in the water (one big rockfish is enough; I never keep medium or small ones). Also, seals will pursue you and even try to snag the fish off the deck. No disasters so far, but a sharp lookout is mandatory, and it helps to keep the fish on the foredeck.

The glove prevents injuries from fish spines, which can get infected.

I switched to 60 lb test Spectra line, from 40 lb test monofilament. Spectra is tough stuff and does not get cut easily. The down side is it requires more care in attaching to the lure. Google up best knot for spectra line and check out the choices. For bottom fishing, I have not been using a leader with it. The fish seem to go for motion and sound and the Spectra does not seem to spook them. I use cheap lead headed jigs adorned with a plastic worm. A lost rig runs under a dollar, so I don't mind bouncing the jig on a rocky bottom. Some places a 1 or 2 ounce jig wont get down fast enough and stay there, so I also carry a couple 3 and 4 ounce jigs. They are all very ugly, but the fish dont seem to care.

Others I paddle with mooch for salmon, using buzz bombs or other lures, and their gear is very different.
 

justincdst

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Joined
Aug 3, 2012
Messages
51
Location
48.383 -123.733
Thanks again SheilaP and Dave, I might take you up on the offer in the near future. My regular paddling partner in crime recently moved back home to the east coast so I've been solo paddling it whenever I can get out (which hasn't been to much lately either).
 

Stumpy

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Joined
Mar 13, 2008
Messages
531
Location
staten island, new york
I was always impressed by the coke bottle reels used by fishermen in Mexico and the Carribean... use the neck for a handle, and the waisted portion for the reel.
 
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