freebie online talk on stoves and provisions for sea kayaking

kayakwriter

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Feb 27, 2006
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Thanks Philip, I'd love to watch this but the time difference makes this not-doable for me. Are they recorded for later viewing?CheersJohn
So as far I know, the upcoming ones won't be recorded, but my debut/test version of this talk, which I gave to the Nanaimo Paddlers was. It won't be as polished as the upcoming ones, but here you go:

 

kayakwriter

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Bumping this post as by popular demand (well, I liked it...), I'll be presenting this talk again on December 7 at 6PM. We're trying something different for this present - no pre-registration required - just show up for the Zoom meeting. Zoom link and password here on this Facebook page.
https://www.facebook.com/events/440299921588935?ref=newsfeed

And for those who don't do Fakebook:

Access Details:
Zoom link: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/89036530935...
Meeting ID: 890 3653 0935
Passcode: 354905
 

eggabeewa

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Dec 12, 2019
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Greater Vancouver, BC
Great presentation. Thanks. But I would like to add one thing about propane tanks. The one lb tanks should never be refilled. They are prone to leaking and don't have a safety to prevent overfilling. I know the internet is full of information about how to do it but it is potentially dangerous and it is illegal to transport them if refilled.
 

kayakwriter

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But I would like to add one thing about propane tanks. The one lb tanks should never be refilled. They are prone to leaking and don't have a safety to prevent overfilling. I know the internet is full of information about how to do it but it is potentially dangerous and it is illegal to transport them if refilled.
Thanks for the suggestion. I joked a bit about explosions in this first version of the talk; I've been much more explicit about the danger and illegality of it in my subsequent live talks.
 

Mac50L

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Aug 18, 2014
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South Island, New Zealand
A quick look at the video, where are the kerosene stoves? The good old Primus with alcohol (methelated spirits) preheat and cheap fuel. It was a skill to have water boiling before the others had got their vacuum flasks out of their hatches for morning tea.

Mine packed down, burner unscrewed, legs folded up, uprights off, all kept in a small bag.
 

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kayakwriter

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Feb 27, 2006
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A quick look at the video, where are the kerosene stoves? The good old Primus with alcohol (methelated spirits) preheat and cheap fuel. It was a skill to have water boiling before the others had got their vacuum flasks out of their hatches for morning tea. Mine packed down, burner unscrewed, legs folded up, uprights off, all kept in a small bag.
So my first "real" (non Sterno) campstove was the venerable Svea 123 - a white gas stove, but part of the Optimus/Primus family. I occasionally used kerosene in my Whisperlite Internationale stove when travelling overseas, but was never a big fan of it - maybe I just had bad luck, but it seemed to spill often and leave greasy stains on my bags. But I hear you on its cheapness and safety (no explosive fumes like white gas). But I think even you might have a challenge getting water on the boil for a cuppa faster than the Jetboil and some of the other superfast LPG canister stoves...

The use of kerosene might also be a cultural thing; in decades of kayaking, I don't remember seeing any North American kayakers cooking with kerosene. Sort of the reverse of electric kayak pumps, perhaps, which are rare in North America, but I understand common in Australia and New Zealand. And I am with you on the electric pumps!
 

Mac50L

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Aug 18, 2014
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368
Location
South Island, New Zealand
The use of kerosene might also be a cultural thing; in decades of kayaking, I don't remember seeing any North American kayakers cooking with kerosene.
Almost odd. I'm fairly sure I had it with me when I rode my bicycle 3.500 km up the Californian coast in 1985 so most likely I was the only person cooking with kerosene.

Eventually I went to a Svea 123 and then gas canisters. The burner for a gas canister is very small and easily carried and hopefully the cans can be bought in the country one is travelling to.

Sort of the reverse of electric kayak pumps, perhaps, which are rare in North America, but I understand common in Australia and New Zealand. And I am with you on the electric pumps!
Some might have them though I don't know any.
JKA, any you know?
 
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