Frej XS

DavidDeWitt

Builder and paddler
Joined
Jul 24, 2020
Messages
11
Location
Boston
Looks great but there is really no need for fill coats on the inside of a hull (or deck). All a fill coat really does is add weight.
 

LAM

Paddler
Joined
Dec 28, 2012
Messages
247
Location
Outside
“I've always enjoyed watching everyone else's builds so I thought I'd share too. I'm sure Lila needs another boat Doug...”

I just saw this!! :D:D:D Actually I am going to have Doug help me build a paddle board over next winter!

I have also been enjoying reading about your build. I really liked the red as well, but black is the next best color. Looking forward to seeing it on the water. Thanks for sharing!

Lila
 

BigandSmall

Paddler
Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
333
Location
Northern BC (FSJ)
Thanks David, I was hoping to do that on the sides. I had intended to just do the bottom where it would be visible through the cockpit and hatches. Unfortunately I had a couple of sags on the sides that looked bad. That 2nd fill coat will allow me to sand out those mistakes and keep it looking good. With any luck I'll only need one under the deck.

Lila, I look forward to seeing the paddle board come together.
 

JohnAbercrombie

Paddler
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
3,332
Location
Victoria, BC
Looks great but there is really no need for fill coats on the inside of a hull (or deck). All a fill coat really does is add weight.
Sometimes I've had pinholes in the first layer when the glass is applied, so a fill coat helps with that. If you do a good job of removing all the excess epoxy in the glass layer (read Ted Moores on technique for that) , it leaves a pretty rough surface which is a magnet for dirt (and water), so a thin fill coat can be an advantage even in the compartments. Not glassy even and smooth, just smoother. In the cockpit I usually put an extra layer of glass or Dynel where my heels will land, as well as tie-downs on the sole (hull) for pump, etc.. so those areas get extra epoxy then.
 

BigandSmall

Paddler
Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
333
Location
Northern BC (FSJ)
What do you suggest for light weight bulkheads? I was thinking about using strip scraps to make panels and then planing them right down with an electric hand plane. I have some marine ply scraps a friend gave me but I was planning on use those for hatch lips.
 

JohnAbercrombie

Paddler
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
3,332
Location
Victoria, BC
What do you suggest for light weight bulkheads?
Your plan with the strips is 'standard' with strip-built boats, and should work well. The weight of the cedar is so little that I wouldn't bother planing it down - it will only save a few ounces. I know, " a bit here, a bit there.." and I've never had a lot of luck building a very lightweight boat. :) I have a thickness sander so I'd probably glass one side and then run the panel through the sander before glassing the other side.
I use epoxy-glass panels for bulkheads. I lay up about 4 layers of 6oz glass with epoxy on mylar sheet with plywood under and over the Mylar to weight it down and keep it flat. If I didn't have the Mylar, I'd probably use a piece of (window or tempered) glass, waxed, and lay up on that. Wax paper works OK for a non-sticking separator, but try to buy the best stuff you can find - some of the no-name wax paper is very stingy with the wax. You can always add a swipe of paste floor wax (or mold release wax) to the wax paper or Mylar, etc..
Or, much simpler, just glass both sides of a piece of 1/8 doorskin. I've glassed thin plywood when making skeg boxex, and thicker plywood for rudder footboards.
On all those layups PeelPly gives a nice matte surface ready for bonding without sanding.
 

BigandSmall

Paddler
Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
333
Location
Northern BC (FSJ)
Put a few hours in today sanding the hull. Found the cloth in a couple of small spots. I know that with wood that this would disappear with varnish. I suspect that it might make a grey blemish with the graphite though? I'll put a thin touch up on once I finish the rest of the hull.
 

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