Great tips on practicing for rolling

Tongo-Rad

Administrator
Joined
Feb 14, 2019
Messages
93
Location
Victoria
This is a useful, short video on using a paddle float to practice recovery technique for the balance brace and standard roll. Yoga is a great means to get the flexibility to have your shoulders flat to the water's surface, and especially helpful for learning to do this on both sides of your kayak.


What other tips helped you to get a successful roll?
 

nootka

Paddler
Joined
May 26, 2007
Messages
1,682
Location
Campbell River
A reasonably good video, with good tips, but roller leads with his head. His chin should almost be touching his shoulder.

I'm somewhat biased towards learning with a greenland paddle - there are extensive videos avaliable.
 

nootka

Paddler
Joined
May 26, 2007
Messages
1,682
Location
Campbell River
more greenland rolling DVDs and videos:

Greenland Rolling with Maligiaq & Dubside Part 1

Greenland Rolling with Maligiaq & Dubside Part 2

This is the Roll 1

Simplifying the Roll with Helen Wilson

James Manke load and drive

Dubside's youtube channel

West Coast Sea Kayak Symposium Greenland Rolling Demo 2005

West Coast Sea Kayak Symposium Greenland Rolling Demo 2007

A Greenland Rolling session by an amateur, 2016:
 

cougarmeat

Paddler
Joined
Sep 17, 2012
Messages
885
Location
Bend OR USA
The only issue I have with the Greenland suite of rolls is the boats are sort of made for them. Look at that back deck. Or should I say, "Look for the back deck?" I'm not saying you can't adapt the Greenland roll to a "regular" boat. or a European Blade roll to a Greenland boat. I'm just saying that if you have trouble doing what you see in the video, you might not have the same equipment.

For a long time, I was confused watching videos because they seemed to contradict each other. They weren't clear about the type of roll they were teaching. Or I'd hear the instructor in the video say, "keep the blade on/near the surface of the water, and yet when he executed the roll, his blade dove in at a pretty good angle.

For me, the videos can lead to refinement - filling off the rough edges. But there's nothing like being in a pool with an instructor who knows what they are doing and understands that, yoga aside, some older folk just don't have the flexibility they had when they were in their 60's. :)

In other words, they suggest a technique that works for you, for your body geometry and kayak characteristics.
 

mick_allen

Paddler & Moderator
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
3,384
back to the OP: one of the issues with that form of paddle float exercise is that blade dynamics are covered up and can't be practised.
And the 'blade near the surface' only makes sense if floatation is a feature - otherwise . . . airplanes can only fly on the air surface? where's that at?

I'm not spry enough, but one should be able to roll with the paddle on the opposite side and diving . . . in some respects, it's just rotation. Is there a greenland roll like that? Maybe a reverse sculling roll would cover the idea. I've certainly done it vertically and frantically, heh heh heh. . . . I think it's called the 'screaming brace'.
 

nootka

Paddler
Joined
May 26, 2007
Messages
1,682
Location
Campbell River
The only issue I have with the Greenland suite of rolls is the boats are sort of made for them.
Quite true for the rolls done without a paddle.
The West Coast Sea Kayak Symposium Greenland Rolling Demo 2005 (above) shows Dubside rolling a variety of "kayaks".

For Mick, the vertical sculling roll:
 
Last edited:

Tongo-Rad

Administrator
Joined
Feb 14, 2019
Messages
93
Location
Victoria
These are great video additions!

About other instructors in the Vancouver Island area on Greenland paddling, I'm happy to recommend Patti & Yves from GoKayak, and Paulo Ouellet.

...one of the issues with that form of paddle float exercise is that blade dynamics are covered up and can't be practised.
My partner and I found a paddle float was a useful tool to teach our bodies initially where the paddle needed to be and what it felt like from the catch to the recovery position. Learning about the 'claws to paws' (from the 'Kayak To The Sea' video below) technique of tilting of the paddle could still be done with the paddle float on, even though it wouldn't have affected the floating end, still reinforced our muscle memory. We'd then use less and less air until we removed the float entirely. It's been a great way to ease into the more intimidating GL rolls.

Having someone video you underwater while you roll is a practical resource for spotting what's going well and what needs work. Coming from someone who grew up with a fear of deep water, I never thought rolling would be so much fun! :p

 

mick_allen

Paddler & Moderator
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
3,384
That's a great video, Al . . . it's interesting that in order to effect a full roll and keep the paddle vertical, he has to roll the kayak over the top of the submerged vertical paddle - and his tech is so good, he hardly moves it at all. [I wonder if rapidly diving the vertical paddle's floatation provides any assist too? has to.]
My efforts happen when getting 'knocked' over and the paddle blade is no where near the surface . . . and the short cut-off scream is missing too!

**

In some respects I have no standing to make actual comments here on ultimate roll technique, but the best way I know, or have seen, to keep blade dynamics while having paddle float assist is the slit and sliding paddle float. ie, a pneumatic paddlefloat [with varying less floatation] is slit so that it can slide along the paddle loom and it is kept inboard, or outboard, or quite outboard of the outboard hand.
That way the blade is always completely exposed, the float assist and its location can be varied and most [not all] roll dynamics can be practised without having to bail out.
It's almost as useful as practising how to push off the bottom so that you also don't have to wet exit during solo practice. [That's a learned simple and useful technique as well!]
 
Top