Hullivator 898

cyclegranny

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Aug 12, 2020
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Courtenay
Not reccomended to use anything but the very expensive thule racks. Anyone know if any other racks will work with this system?
 

cyclegranny

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Aug 12, 2020
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Courtenay
Thule bar racks (rectangular load bars, oval Aero bars, wing-shaped AeroBlade bars, and Xsporter bars), Yakima round bar racks, and many Thule load bar-equivalent aftermarket bars.
Both it seems
 

JohnAbercrombie

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Dec 7, 2011
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Victoria, BC
Thule bar racks (rectangular load bars, oval Aero bars, wing-shaped AeroBlade bars, and Xsporter bars), Yakima round bar racks, and many Thule load bar-equivalent aftermarket bars.
Both it seems
Well, you have the answer to your question!
Good racks that are a secure fit on modern vehicles are expensive, no doubt about it. For most vehicles the days of 'clamp something to the rain gutters' are gone. Remember that with Thule/Yakima you can usually move the rack to a new vehicle by buying new adapters (though Thule seems to be moving away from the old rectangular bars).
I have both Thule and Yakima (both non-aero) racks on different VWs. I think the Thule racks are a bit better designed, and it's definitely more secure to clamp something to a rectangular bar than a round bar. If you have a good rack dealer locally, ask them for advice. In Victoria, Rack Attack has a good reputation and they seem to give sound advice. Used racks are always available on the local online ads here so that's an option if you are patient.
 

cyclegranny

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Aug 12, 2020
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Courtenay
Wondering what the Thule load bar-equivalent aftermarket bars are, five hundred for a piece of extruded aluminum, call me old fashioned... I see Micks Garage out of Ireland has some Italian racks for much less, but not sure if the thule stuff will fit them, guess I'll have a chat with their rep
 

BigandSmall

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Mar 2, 2012
Messages
337
Location
Northern BC (FSJ)
One thing to watch with Hullivators is that the rack needs to stick out from the edge a bit. If you don't have enough clearance between the lowered rack and your vehicle the bounce effect of lowering can leave creases in the side of your car. Make sure the salesperson knows that you intend to use the bars with a Hullivator. Hard to beat Thule stuff except for the price, it all bolts up so nicely.

If you're making your own crossbars the hullivators have a metall brackets that mount to your crossbars. There are 2 6mm bolts (roughly) that hold these on. You could drill and tap some 1x2 or drill right through and put a nut on. Considering the amount of leverage these crossbars see with a heavy seakayak I would probably use 1x2 x 3/16 to make my crossbars. Pretty heavy stuff but my Thule aero bars are slightly bent up in the middle from the weight of the boats hanging off the Hullivators. I use the 1x2 x3/16 for crossbars on my trailer and its overkill but I don't worry about them either.
 

cyclegranny

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Aug 12, 2020
Messages
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Courtenay
Yes I'm seeing and aware of the 100mm distance needed outboard of the rails
Thanks for the info, am talking to Micks garage who I have found to have great deals and service.
 

Gary Jacek

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Joined
Dec 11, 2009
Messages
311
Location
Victoria, BC
Be aware that the Hullavators are very prone to oilcanning rotomolded kayaks. Due to the two hard plastic lumps that form the carrying surface, the weight of the kayak is concentrated at 4 locations on the hull. I have a custom-shaped Zephyr by Thule.
 

JohnAbercrombie

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Dec 7, 2011
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Victoria, BC
Be aware that the Hullavators are very prone to oilcanning rotomolded kayaks. Due to the two hard plastic lumps that form the carrying surface, the weight of the kayak is concentrated at 4 locations on the hull. I have a custom-shaped Zephyr by Thule.
I have heard this from another paddler as well.
Perhaps some sort of padding is needed to cushion those rugged plastic boats. :)
Or less strap tension- but that's difficult because the Hullivators don't hold a kayak as securely as good cradles on crossbars. Better than those foam blocks, though....
Ordinary cradles mounted on a crossbar will oil-can a plastic boat, too, but not as quickly.
 

drahcir

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Joined
Mar 26, 2010
Messages
655
Location
North Idaho (Sandpoint)
Be aware that the Hullavators are very prone to oilcanning rotomolded kayaks. Due to the two hard plastic lumps that form the carrying surface, the weight of the kayak is concentrated at 4 locations on the hull. I have a custom-shaped Zephyr by Thule.
I have such a Hullavator and made a little pad across those two lumps - a design flaw, not well thought out by Thule.
 

JohnAbercrombie

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Dec 7, 2011
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Victoria, BC
I have such a Hullavator and made a little pad across those two lumps - a design flaw, not well thought out by Thule.
:thumbsup:
That's an excellent idea if you aren't adjusting the spacing of the Thule 'arms' for different boats.
Or does your pad 'float' enough to let the arms move when necessary?
Please post a pic! I've just started using a Hullivator myself.
 

drahcir

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Mar 26, 2010
Messages
655
Location
North Idaho (Sandpoint)
For starters I spared no expense in gathering the needed materials. First I got a roll of garden edging, about 9 cm across (and there is plenty left over). Then I got some cheap plastic, cutting and then gluing to fit over the garden edging, which seemed to want some reinforcement to bridge across the hullavator lumps. I left some garden edging exposed. This was trimmed of its square edges so I could slip it into the hullavator sleeve. The other end is free so the hullavator J-bars can be adjusted as needed. It works fine. John can do something more elegant.

Here are some photos (none with the actual Hullavator since my wife took the car to the Farmers' Market):

IMG_2273.JPG

IMG_2275.JPG
 

CaliPaddler

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Joined
Dec 28, 2018
Messages
17
Another, possibly jankier, solution I use with the Hullavator and plastic hulls—two strips of yoga mat cut to lay across the bumps in the cradle. Combined with the friction and pressure of the boat, they create just enough cushion and stay in place without much added bulk.
 
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