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Knives

handle down is so the blade doesn't slash the face and is slighly better in hand when panic pulling, and handle down will help snag you on your boat so you don't fall off in self rescue, hehheh.
For emergency, a beltcutter would be way quicker and safer and probably should be first choice.
 
mick_allen said:
handle down is so the blade doesn't slash the face and is slighly better in hand when panic pulling, and handle down will help snag you on your boat so you don't fall off in self rescue, hehheh.
For emergency, a beltcutter would be way quicker and safer and probably should be first choice.

I just keep having this bad picture of a knife falling out of the upside down scabbard and pinning my foot to the ground...
 
well then the handle will hit yr toe unless you give the knife rotation by doing cartwheels. Oh yeah, I forgot your walk, heh heh.

But the falling scenario is during paddling: it falls out of the scabbard handle down onto the tight, tight sprayskirt, it then bounces back up at you in a trampoline like fashion and pins your eye to the back of your head as you look downward to see what's going on.
 
mick_allen said:
But the falling scenario is during paddling: it falls out of the scabbard handle down onto the tight, tight sprayskirt, it then bounces back up at you in a trampoline like fashion and pins your eye to the back of your head as you look downward to see what's going on.

OMG! Last day of 2011 and here is the best and funniest post of the year!! I actually laughed out loud! :D

What about having to cut the fishing line because there is no way you're going to land that 40 pounder.. And you sure don't want to lose that $300 fishing rod.
 
mick_allen said:
well then the handle will hit yr toe unless you give the knife rotation by doing cartwheels. Oh yeah, I forgot your walk, heh heh.

But the falling scenario is during paddling: it falls out of the scabbard handle down onto the tight, tight sprayskirt, it then bounces back up at you in a trampoline like fashion and pins your eye to the back of your head as you look downward to see what's going on.

Or just landing point down on the skirt .... look ma, no water tight integrity. Better make that a short knife or its your giblets that get pinned to the hull.
 
ken_vandeburgt said:
I just keep having this bad picture of a knife ... pinning my foot to the ground...
That happened to me once. It's not a story I share publicly though, and I definitely won't talk about it without a couple of beers, which might be what got me into that trouble in the first place.
 
ken_vandeburgt said:
Dumb question: is there any valid reason for having a knife attached to your pfd? Particularly commando style (handle down)?

I'm trying to remember why I thought it might be a good idea. :?

I paddle a fair bit of whitewater (canoe) and in that situation there are ropes combined with moving water. When the rope is attached to a canoe being swept through a rapid, having the rope wrapped around an ankle is not ideal. If that happens, I want to have that chance to free myself offered by the knife on my pfd. When I'm paddling my kayak the odds of needing it are less since I'm never lining a loaded kayak down a class 3 rapid, but I use the same pfd so the knife stays put.

In the scenario I mentioned above the rope could be dragging you down. A friend wiped out in a rapid where a short waterfall joins the fray at a 90° angle resulting in a large whirlpool (which he was fishing nearby when he ended up in the water). The rope tied to the stern was wrapped around his wrist. He credits the rope and his canoe with saving his life - since the canoe remained upright on the surface after dumping him and his father-in law out. He was sucked down into the whirlpool but the canoe circling in the current above dragged him out. I don't think he was wearing a life jacket (this was over 20 years ago and before he knew better).

Cheers,
Bryan
 
Back In The Day (80's) I had a knife on my PFD because I had to for work - at OB it was mandated for all instructional staff. And like all things mandated (or many, at least) we applied little critical thinking to it. I never used it once for rescue but spread plenty of peanut butter.

As a SAR tech with YOSAR I continued to wear it in case I needed to jettison a load. Never happened to me but I know of others who did use theirs in that application.

As a medic I have no idea why I carried it but did (EMS geekdom...)

As a regular paddler in Mexico I have removed it entirely because walking around with a weapon brazenly attached to my person is just not the kind of first impression I want to make on the good people I meet there. I have a nice folding Gerber in my PFD pocket used mainly to hack apart monafilament line left behind by fishers (and more spreading of PB).

Seems like if you are responsible for the lives of others in dynamic environments that include loose ropes that may become tight quickly then it makes sense to have an edge handy. I don't include myself in that group these days so the knife is gone.
 
Dumb question: is there any valid reason for having a knife attached to your pfd? Particularly commando style (handle down)?

I'm trying to remember why I thought it might be a good idea.

Two reasons; the second reason only applies to gentlemen

1) It makes you look like a bad ass

2) You have something to hook your sprayskirt loop on to when you take a wee
 
Happy holidays everyone,

Santa came and I got a Deep See Wenoka Titanium which I just love and it fits great on my Kokatat Outfit PFD attachment point tucked nicely inside the shoulder strap.

The locking mechanism on the Wenoka looks to be very positive in terms of not coming out unless both lock tabs are pressed at the same time. But remembering Murphy's Law ...... there is always a way things happen when not expecting them. :D

Having never carried a knife before what are your thoughts on securing the knife with a lanyard / carabiner? My concern would be the at least arms length of cord which could be tucked inside the the PFD shoulder strap. But then again if you go to use the knife and it's not there that would make for a bad day.

Mark
 
Just my two cents ,my knife mounts sideways low on pfd, handle facing strong hand (Stohlquist Descent Rescue PFD)


So far never an issue with cowboy scramble type of re-entry

Also the cord to pfd to knive in moving water scenario can make for an expensive plastic surgery bill if things go south just a thought
 
I don't carry a knife anymore (don't worry, I balance it off by not having a 50 foot throw line to get tangled in :shock:), but I had two of the same squeeze lock knives. I have one now because the other is at the bottom of a lake. It popped out during rescue practice. I didn't even notice until I got back to shore, which I suppose is better than having the knife pop out of its sheath and noticing the hilt sticking out of your gut or leg.

I did carry the other around for a while, but now I just think it's more of a liability. Just be careful as the locking mechanism is not infallible.
 
I've met a few relatively experienced guides who prefer a largish surgical scissors, arguing that if a line (for example) is not taut, it is difficult to sever with only one hand available. They seem aware that spreading peanut butter with the scissors is awkward and therefore also have a folding knike tucked in a pfd pocket.
 
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