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Lighter, smaller replacement for C-Tug?

SingingWaters

New Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2023
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8
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Canada
My kayak is 13.5' long and weighs 45 lbs (thermoformed). The C-Tug (with inflatable tires) takes up too much room in my subcompact car, even disassembled, because it's in competition with camping, biking, and hiking gear in the same trip. Is there a smaller, lighter cart that would do the job adequately?
 
The c-tug is fairly small and low, so to go similarly small, I guess one'd have to start with the wheels and try to go solid first and then as small diameter as possible - assuming axles that enable variable wheels.

After that, I guess one could look at an axle only concept where the axle is a strong enough truss approach to take the weight and yet still collapse completely flat to stow. So that could mean an extruded triangle that pin hinges at each joint to lay flat, slightly dips in the middle to hold the yak hull.

the lower pin hinge doubles as the axle and that hinge also triples as continuous bend resistance for the axle [it becomes part of the truss. Use 6" [150mm] solid wheels as the whole idea is minimalism but add an extra cm or so to maybe allow 8" [200mm] wheels.

10" or bigger wheels would start pushing axle width and truss size [for hull clearance] so other approaches might be better such as the 4 stick [assuming minimalism].

-an idea anyway.
 
Is there a smaller, lighter cart that would do the job adequately?
Almost any common cart would be less bulky than the C-Tug.
Storage inside the kayak is usually a greater concern that in-car storage, so lots of efforts have been made to reduce the cart volume when dis-assembled.
The EasyMarcs kayak is very elegant:

Pricey, but interesting...
 
Why not make your own trolley? I always do and they stow easily.
Wheels? Pick what suits.
DO NOT try building one shown on YouTube. Really daft designs there and they use 3 times as many parts as needed. The two "T" parts do not have to be linked other by the axle. The bits to keep it up while loading, don't use a solid bar.
 
This one doesn't break down the same but it's pretty convenient to use as long as you're not trying to get it in a hatch. It's called the Peanut kayak carrier by Seattle Sports. The wheels pop off easily but that's about it. I slip it over one end, connect the bungee cord and walk it like a wheelbarrow. There's no lifting the boat and doing up the cam straps. It fits kayaks but not canoes. On a separate note I stick light weight soft gear in the cockpit when tight on room for transport. I find those Seals cockpit covers are a must for all our kayaks.
Peanut kayak carrier.jpg
 
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The wheels pop off easily but that's about it. I slip it over one end, connect the bungee cord and walk it like a wheelbarrow. There's no lifting the boat and doing up the cam straps. It fits kayaks but not canoes.
How are the wheels held on? I use R pins, a pull off split pin.
You still have to lift one end of the kayak and thread it through the trolley.
Mine you don't thread the kayak through it, just lift one end on.
Mine fits everything.
 
Why not make your own trolley? I always do and they stow easily.
Wheels? Pick what suits.
DO NOT try building one shown on YouTube. Really daft designs there and they use 3 times as many parts as needed. The two "T" parts do not have to be linked other by the axle. The bits to keep it up while loading, don't use a solid bar.

Hey Mac,

Will a pvc trolley like that support a loaded kayak? I sometimes wheel my loaded (for one week trip) onto BCF to get over to the island.

Cheers,

Rog
 
Will a pvc trolley like that support a loaded kayak? I sometimes wheel my loaded (for one week trip) onto BCF to get over to the island.
It might depend on the plastic you can get. I reinforce the vertical pieces by putting pipe over them, same sized pipe, split to fit and plenty of glue to hold it all. The tubing is 40 mm diameter. I just checked and the tubing I'm using is fairly thin. There is thicker available.

The first trolley was aluminium scrap and welded. It was eventually used on the Fiji trip with a loaded double and a single on top one time. Otherwise a loaded double often and on soft sand, almost up to the axle.

Using two "T"s which aren't locked together removes a lot of stress.
 
Hey Mac, didn't mean to come off as down on your design. Was just sharing an alternative. The wheels are held on by a snowblower wheel locking pin type not sure of the actual name.
 
I've resisted commenting on this "pin", but as a PSA - you might want to call it a "thumb snapper" (or perhaps a more colorful term). The wheels on my cart are held on by a ringed "pin" that goes through a hole in the axle bar. Problem is, that the ring/pin relation is spring-loaded. So during the process of bending the ring away from the pin, to insert or remove the pin from the cart axle, the pin/bar will snap back and smack your thumb.

It's an amazing phenomenon. Because no matter how careful you are, how much experience you've had with it, how much you are aware of the potential "ouch" - it still happens. It's like the pin knows. It waits until just a moment of distraction, then it springs like a leopard, back to its neutral position, trapping your thumb under it.

Open Pin
OpenPin.jpg


Closed Pin
ClosedPin.jpg
 
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I've been around 2 pvc cart failures with loaded kayaks - so Mac's approach of reinforcement makes good sense to me.

For the clips, I use large clips that look like paper-clips but as I like to keep all the clips and washers still attached to the axle, I don't like how they stick out and intrude - it would pack together better in a separate bag, but then there's a greater loss potential. but I do keep a foot or 2 of wire wrapped around the axle just in case for replacements.
 
Hey Mac, didn't mean to come off as down on your design. Was just sharing an alternative. The wheels are held on by a snowblower wheel locking pin type not sure of the actual name.
Yes, it is an alternative that gets over that problem of some designs of being short fore and aft and needing very tight strapping down.
It is a good approach the only thing being is it easy to thread the kayak through the hoop?

As for wheel retaining pins -

1698745254314.png
1698745272889.png
 
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