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Logging Flores Island

GWarner

Paddler
Joined
Jul 1, 2007
Messages
46
Dan Lewis, of Rainbow Kayak in Tofino, is working with the "Friends of Clayoquot Sound, who are organizing opposition to the flagging of Flores Island for logging.

There's a report in groups newsletter that can be picked up an any MEC store. I've emailed Dan for an update on the logging. But have not heard back from him. Like all of us he's usually got a million things on the go at any time.

Flores is the only remaining west shore coastal island that has not been logged. Years ago, 1999, logging companies signed an undertaking agreeing not to log the uncut areas of Clayoquot Sound. That included Flores Island. Iisaak Logging appears ready to go ahead in spite of the memorandum. Indeed Iisaak may not have signed the original memorandum.

If you don't want to see more clear cuts on the west coast as you paddle in the area, or on the other hand if you do support logging Flores, you can pass along your comments to the following. Of course the Friends of Clayoquot Sound are asking that people support their efforts.

Pat Bell
Minister of Forests and Range
P.O. Box 9049
Station Provincial Government
Victoria, BC
V8W 9E2

Tel Fax 250-387-1040 or email the minister at

For.Minister@gov.bc.ca

If the thought of anything green or tree huggers sends anyone into epileptic fits, I do apologise. There may even be rational, economic, cultural and maybe even environmental arguments for logging Flores. I simply do not know.
 
When I read the announcement, I will admit it made me chuckle.
Originally the 'Preservationists' needed the First Nations to help block further logging in Clayoquot Sound (mid-80's thru mid 90's protests) ...and now the First Nations are going to resume logging activity themselves in the area.

You might want to read the Company's (Iisaak Forest Resources) website...
http://www.iisaak.com/

I'm not saying I agree with the plan, I would have to see the actual plan before giving an opinion.

Just remember one thing...funny thing about trees...they grow back!
Remember Meares Island?

One thing is for sure...this blockade action will be a much harder task than the original movement...your dealing with local First Nations opposed to a huge (faceless) Corporate Logging Company.
 
GWarner said:
Dan Lewis, of Rainbow Kayak in Tofino
Dan Lewis, of Rainforest Kayak Adventures http://rainforestkayak.com/

Flores is the only remaining west shore coastal island that has not been logged. Years ago, 1999, logging companies signed an undertaking agreeing not to log the uncut areas of Clayoquot Sound. That included Flores Island. Iisaak Logging appears ready to go ahead in spite of the memorandum. Indeed Iisaak may not have signed the original memorandum.

Flores Island, is the second largest island on the west coast of Vancouver Island (Nootka Island being the largest). Flores is essentially completly intact. There was once a very small amount of logging in Steamer Cove on the far north of the island, and some development in the immediate vicinity of the Village of Ahousaht. Flores is a popular kayaking destination, including Cow Bay, Whitesand Beach, and Siwash Cove. It forms part of the backdrop to kayak trips to Vargas Island. Flores Island is easily visible from Tofino, BC. There are a number of other islands in Clayoquot which have not been logged, however Flores Island is by-far the most significant.

A map of the logged areas of Vancouver Island can be found here:
http://focs.ca/logging/VI_OG_2004_map-resized.jpg

Flores Island lies in the middle of Clayoquot Sound. Clayoquot Sound holds some of the highest value (ecologically and economically) wood in BC. Clayoquot sound is world renowned for its Ancient Temperate Rainforest. Clayoquot Sound is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve http://www.clayoquotbiosphere.org/

A map of the intact areas of Clayoquot Sound can be found here:
http://focs.ca/logging/Clay_pristine.jpg

Since 1984, when the first logging blockade in Canadian History occurred on Meares Island (a joint protest by First Nations, FOCS, and other locals), Clayoquot Sound has been renowned for the passion it has manifested. Notably, in 1993, the largest act of peaceful civil disobedience occurred in Clayoquot Sound, with a summer of blockades, which resulted in over 850 arrests.

Flores Is, lies in the heart of the traditional Territory of the Ahousaht First Nations (the most populous of the three bands in Clayoquot; Tla-O-Qui-Aht, Ahousaht, and Hesquiaht). Many Ahousaht still reside on Flores Island, in the village of Ahousaht, BC. The village of Ahousaht is one of the most populous first nation villages in BC. Currently, about 1000 people live in the village of Ahousaht. The current National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, Shawn Atleo, is an Ahousaht.

In 1999 a Memorandum of Understand was signed between a number of ENGO's and Iisaak Forest Resources, which agreed, to paraphrase, stop big protests, as long as the forest companies stayed out of the "pristine" areas of Clayoquot Sound. This memorandum has stood for over a decade, and has led to a big decrease in tensions in Clayoquot Sound, while solutions based on Conservation Based Financing have been developing (it is a very complex process). Flores Island was included in this MOU.

The Friends of Clayoquot Sound (FOCS) http://focs.ca/, established in 1979, have been working for the conservation of the terrestrial and marine ecosystems of Clayoquot SOund for over 3 decades. Some of the biggest challenges faced today: a) the perception that Clayoquot is Saved, b) the potential open-pit mine on Catface Mountain c) the potential logging on Flores Island.

There are a host of issues which complicate this issue. Annual Allowable Cut (AAC) volumes, rate of cut allowed in already disturbed regions of Clayoquot, the economic hardships faced by many FN communities, ownership of logging companies, the provincial tenure system and local control of the landbase, FN autonomy, etc etc etc....

I really need to stop writing.... I could be here all day.

Pat Bell
Minister of Forests and Range
P.O. Box 9049
Station Provincial Government
Victoria, BC
V8W 9E2

Tel Fax 250-387-1040 or email the minister at

For.Minister@gov.bc.ca

Yes Please write, or consider supporting organizations working on this issue.

It is a very complex discussion. Personally I truly hope that a solution can be developed which will result in the conservation of Flores, and all of Clayoquot Sound, balanced with the social, and economic, well-being of ALL its communities.


Some other Information:

http://www.focs.ca - Friends of Clayoquot Sound
http://www.iisaak.com/ - Iisaak Forest Resources
http://www.westcoaster.ca/tofino/10...r-Rainforest-For-Logging-Solution-Update.html - A news article on the issue


***** Ken responded while I was writing:
Ken B said:
Just remember one thing...funny thing about trees...they grow back!
Remember Meares Island?
Meares island, as I stated above, was the site of the first logging blockade in Canadian history in 1984-85. As a result, a court injunction was put in place saying no-logging could occur on the island until the treaty issue had been settled. That was over 25 years ago, and the injunction still stands. Meares Island was not logged (with the exception of a couple of small areas in the 50's and a small area in the early part of the 1900's).

Yes, Tree's grow. The issue is more about the intact ancient ecosystem, which is harder to replace. Aspects of ecosystems return, but the fully developed system take millennium to develop. The large flora (the big trees) are merely the poster-children of ancient forests... but they represent a much broader concept of ecosystem integrity.

One thing is for sure...this blockade action will be a much harder task than the original movement...your dealing with local First Nations opposed to a huge (faceless) Corporate Logging Company.
I agree with you Ken. Iisaak is 100% FN owned. I am a strong supporter of the economic development of FN. We are a small community here in Clayoquot.... we all know each other, no matter what side of the fence you place yourself.... I find myself with toes in many corners of the community.

The solution lies not in protest, which has always been regarded as a last-ditch attempt to prevent the action. FOCS (and many other groups) have always actively participated in government process, local decisions, and development of conservation solutions. The solution will lie in the development of a conservation based plan which is agreed to by all local communities (FN and non-FN), provincial government, and the ENGO's. I have hope that this will happen!

If you are interested, there is a report on the logging in Clayoquot Sound from 2000-2009, with a lot of background information. http://focs.ca/news/2010-05-27_logging_report.asp
 

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re/ Meares Island
Whoops...where was my head...of course Meares Island wasn't scalped. :doh:



Anyways...
Here's an interesting read regarding a 2003 Clayoquot Sound Land Use Decision:
http://ilmbwww.gov.bc.ca/slrp/lrmp/nanaimo/clayoquot_sound/index.html
"The plans will guide site-level forest planning and forest harvesting by identifying reserved areas, which are excluded from logging, and harvestable areas, where forestry operations will be implemented in accordance with the Science Panel's vision, goals and objectives for sustainable ecosystem management."
 
Ken B said:
Here's an interesting read regarding a 2003 Clayoquot Sound Land Use Decision:
http://ilmbwww.gov.bc.ca/slrp/lrmp/nanaimo/clayoquot_sound/index.html
"The plans will guide site-level forest planning and forest harvesting by identifying reserved areas, which are excluded from logging, and harvestable areas, where forestry operations will be implemented in accordance with the Science Panel's vision, goals and objectives for sustainable ecosystem management."

Yes, the Scientific Panel made huge steps in the development of logging practices in Clayoquot Sound. It was a huge improvement over the previous status-quo.

The mandate of the the Scientific Panel was to decide how best to log the valleys.

Many people, myself included, contend that the mandate of the Scientific Panel should have been, "should the intact valleys be logged, and then, if so, how best to log the valleys".



I participated in the public reviews of some of the watershed reserve plans, as developed by the Scientific Panel. I feel they did great work, but I feel it was unfortunate that they were not allowed to answer the fundemental question whether the intact valleys should be logged at all. I feel there is great intrinsic value (ecological, and economical) to the valleys being left intact.

I am a strong believer in a sustainable, second growth forestry industry. I cannot be a complet hypocrite and say we should not log (I work with wood, I live in a house made of wood). I say second growth in the context that approximatly 75% of the land base of Vancouver Island has been logged at least once. I would think that this land-base should be able to sustain a successful logging industry. I would suggest that Clayoquot Sound, as the largest concentration of Old-Growth remaining on Vancouver Island, deserves special consideration as to its conservation.

Logging practices in British Columbia are generally based on a 100-year cycle. Forestry is planned on a basis to harvest 1% of the land base every year, for 100 years... on principal to leave a mature forest ready to log again in year 100. This is done in an attempt to mimic the natural disturbance regiems of Forest Fires, floods, pest invasions, or landslides. This argument works fairly well in areas such as the boreal, or interior forests of BC. However coastal temperate rainforests have a much longer disturbance cycle, ranging on a 500-1000 year cycle, and indeed some valleys may not have seen a significant disturbance for 5000 years or more.



Please keep in mind that the proposed logging on Flores is most scary as it sets a precedent... in effect opening Flores to continued logging.
 

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Some of the biggest challenges faced today: a) the perception that Clayoquot is Saved, b) the potential open-pit mine on Catface Mountain c) the potential logging on Flores Island.

There is also commercial recreational exploitation of Strathcona Park's Bedwell Valley in the form of horse tours. That is probably being pursued because of FN plans to log the neighboring unlogged Ursus Valley where the horse tours are currently operating. Bedwell was logged mid 1960's despite being in a Provincial Park. It might seem rather minor in comparison to Flores being logged but there are enormous implications for how our Parks are managed.

Clayoquot Sound is under siege again.



The solution lies not in protest, which has always been regarded as a last-ditch attempt to prevent the action. FOCS (and many other groups) have always actively participated in government process, local decisions, and development of conservation solutions. The solution will lie in the development of a conservation based plan which is agreed to by all local communities (FN and non-FN), provincial government, and the ENGO's. I have hope that this will happen!

I like the cut of your jib.

One problem right now though is that our government is broken and they are not listening. Perhaps there has been too much protesting on matters of less importance.

There needs be some permanent solutions.
 

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ken_vandeburgt said:

Ken thank you for posting those links. It was a pleasure to watch them, and see many friends and familiar faces.

I would suggest that every demonstration portrayed in that video, from the Mass Protests of 1993 in Clayoquot Sound, to the more recent 2008 rallies in downtown Victoria are excellent examples of what make the environmental movement in BC a powerful and positive force. They were all peaceful acts of civil disobedience or demonstration.

There are different types of protest, some which I agree with, others which I do not.


Demonstrations: This is like the 2008 rally Victoria, as seen in the videos shared above. A well publisized, peaceful, expression of a segment of the populations opinion. You see rallies of this strain coming from every sector of our society; right-wing, centrist, or left-wing. Demonstrations of this sort are part of what makes our democracy a vibrant entity in which to live. While results are generally not immediate, they do help mould opinions, and eventually may manifest themselves in policy and law set-out by governments.

Peaceful Civil Disobedience: A good example of this was the 1993 protests in Clayoquot Sound. Willfully disobeying a law in which one feels is unjust. In the act of disobeying, no other individuals are harmed, your identity is visible, and one willfully accepts whatever judgement is handed down to them through the justice system. By bringing the issue in front of the justice system it forces society to either re-affirm, or realize the folly of, a particular policy or law. A great example of someone who advocated Peaceful Civil Disobedience was Mohandas Gandhi. In order to bring attention to laws which he felt were unjust, Gandhi willingly broke laws, in a peaceful fashion, accepted the consequences (he was jailed many times), and ultimatly helped win India its independance.

Non-Peaceful Civil Disobedience: Examples of this can be seen in frustrations by minorites (ethnic, political, or moral) around the world. Where clashes with police or security forces often result in street battles. This is often an expression of helplessness which is unleashed. I do not think this is the basis on which to build a better world, and do not advocate this type of protest.

"Black-Bloc" / "Anarchist" Type Protest: Please excuse the use of "Anarchist" to describe this form of protest. The media generally affixes this term to these protests, but it is not exactly correct. Anarchism as a political belief is simply the belief in non-governance... not violence. Examples of this can be seen at many international summits (G8, G20, WTO type events), where individuals will rampage, wearing balaclavas, bandanas, or other means of obscuring their identity, with the pure intent of causing damage to public & private property, or to clash with the police. (This is unfortunate, because it generally detracts from the vast majority of individuals who may attend these events to protest peacefully on an issue they feel passionate). Individuals who practice forms of "Black-Block" type tactics, generally do not promote any particular issue or cause, but simply have a distast for authority, and use the opportunity to express this. I do not agree with this type of activity.


I believe everyone should have the right to peacefully express their opinions. Even if I do not agree with you, I will try my best to ensure you have the right to say it. The fundementals of free-speech.
 
Our government has gone to great expense to try and justify its decision to change the Strathcona Park Masterplan in order to allow one commercial resort to run horse tours in the Bedwell Valley. Here is one of the reports generated:

http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/planni ... assess.pdf

The attached link has pictures (appendix 3) along the old roadbed that clearly shows the ongoing erosion that is occuring in the Bedwell Valley (which is part of Clayoquot Sound) as a result of logging. Debris torrents, riverbank erosion, changes in stream course, and complete washouts of long sections of roadbed are shown.

The pictures were taken more than 40 years since logging has occured. Note that the forest is a long way from recovery.

The report discusses the hazards that are present as a result of abandoned infrastructure such as wooden culverts and bridges.

That is what Flores Island will look like even if logging is done 'sustainably'.
 
Has anyone heard anything from Dan Lewis.
i sent him an email for an update prior to my original post and have heard nothing back from him. I wanted to talk with him about this issue and ask if the "Friends" campaign has advanced or if they've come to a resolution or any understanding with the logging company.
 
I think they are still talking with the company and trying to work something out.
 
ROAD BUILDING PERMIT APPLIED FOR FLORES ISLAND

Clayoquot Sound, and Flores Island are a huge part of BC's paddling world. Many of us who read this forum, will have the pleasure to visit this area of majestic white sand beaches, and ancient forests, mingling with the power of the open ocean.

Iisaak Forest Resources has applied for a road building permit on Flores Island. These permits are often granted within two weeks. The logging of Intact Flores Island is imminent. This road building is in a seperate area from the proposed Helicopter Logging in a seperate intact valley on Flores. This road building is in preperation for even MORE logging on Flores.

PLEASE, take 3 minutes, and write a letter to the government Minister, voiceing your opinion (whatever it may be). It forms part of the permanent record, and can truely have an impact.

It is very quick. Please follow the link from http://www.focs.ca/

Thank you... (I have written my letter... have you?)


*****
Edit: opps... Ken beat me to the punch!
 
Thanks for the heads-up. I really appreciate this forum's ability to keep the paddling community apprised of environmental issues.
 
AM said:
Thanks for the heads-up. I really appreciate this forum's ability to keep the paddling community apprised of environmental issues.

Indeed; had it not been posted on here, I would never have heard anything about it.

I'm spreading the word to anyone I can, but I wish it was getting out to the general populace.
 
I'm spreading the word to anyone I can, but I wish it was getting out to the general populace.

Try facebook: Friends of Clayoquot Sound.

Paste the action alert on your wall.

Voila...social media is going Egyptian...
 
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