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Lots of experienced builders here! Ur thots on rigging?

Teach

Paddler
Joined
Nov 2, 2012
Messages
35
Location
Penticton BC
Well with lots of help and suggestions from all of you, it looks like we have made decisions on our boats. Looks like it will be the Tern 14 for my wife and the Pinguino 145 for myself. :big_thumb I really liked the 4pd aesthetically better but Jim at Pygmy suggested I might have comfort issues because of my foot size so the standard 145 it is. :cry:

Now I just gotta spend more money right? I hate doing that!!! :lol:

Ok here's a loaded question for you all, for general use paddling what would be the best way to rig the deck with all the safety features and all the fancy bling items to take the kitchen sink along without going ridiculously overboard on it. I'm thinking things like extra paddle or perhaps a storm model, perhaps a bow bag for access to camera/fishing gear. You know..........all that FARKLE!

Is a tow line recommended as with sailboats?

What about the optional Hatch and bulkhead kits?

Factory or carved foam seats?

And anything else you can think of I'm all ears so weigh in now cuz order day is coming quick. Thanks everyone! :big_thumb

Teach

Edit.....Oh I almost forgot to ask.....how much of this stuff can be made as to funcion well? And is it worth the effort? Or should I just bite it and buy it all?
 
I'd definitely recommend the bulkheads and hatches option, unless you are happy with the idea of using (and maintaining) flotation bags in the ends of the kayaks. That's a safety issue - you need one or the other (or both- you can always stuff flotation bags into the hatches if you don't rust the seals).

Most of the Pygmy boats shown on the website don't have perimeter deck lines - another thing that I think is a necessary safety feature for rescues, etc. So you should be thinking about anchor points for deck lines as you build.
Same goes for end toggles- lots of opinions on those , but I like the style that the NDK boats use (no loops to trap fingers/hands if the boat rolls).

All the stuff like paddles, deck bags, etc can wait till later. I wouldn't rush out to buy a spare paddle if your paddling trips will be short, since you may well decide to 'move up' from your original main paddle, or decide that you need a different length, etc.

You may want to order extra epoxy - you'll find uses for it later (it doesn't spoil) and you may waste a bit more than expected if these are your first big epoxy projects.

You are gonna have fun! :big_thumb
 
I echo John's comments completely.

I'm a bit of the exception to the rule here and did install perimeter lines on my Pygmy and highly recommend that anyone building a sea kayak should as well -- if you're int he water, it's pretty tough to grab onto a boat that doesn't have perimeter lines if you're in rough conditions.

There are a number of ways that you can install them -- mine are adjustable (I can tighten them when paddling with bare hands or loosen them for colder weather when I'm wearing gloves) and work well. I did a fairly elaborate "soft padeye" installation using webbing and slots through the decking that I most likely will do differently next time around -- the strapping wears out eventually and needs replacing -- I'm at that point now, and it's going to be a major job.

Here's a few of photos:








Looking forward to seeing your build -- I think my next boat might be a Penguino.

btw: my boat currently doesn't look anything as shiny as it did when these photos were taken -- I've got work to do. :oops:
 

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echo all the above about strong perimeter lines, end grabs, hatches and bulkheads.
Also paddlefloats (and though not deck rigging - likely get immersion protection gear of some sort).
If have limited skill, pool sessions or a course for self rescuing.
 
Ditto on the above.
Bulkheads & hatches: yes, definitely.
Perimeter lines: yes, definitely. Make sure you can actually grab them with cold wet hands while wearing paddling gloves (consider beads to raise the deck lines a bit off of the deck, there are a couple of other solutions too). Don't substitute bungee for good cord.
Grab loops, fore and aft deck bungees, make sure you have a good place to stow a spare paddle.

Mick's comment about the course is a good one and you don't need to wait until the kayak is complete to take a course - it helps to highlight how some of these deck features get used and how having poorly set up deck (eg bungee only, or not enough places to grab on the boat) becomes a problem in the water.

Cheers,
Bryan
 
Your back will thank you for seat with good sacrum support someday. I like my Jackson's Sweet Cheek over the reguler seat pan which dose not fit me well. And I love Immersion Research's back band which I can adjust how much lumber support I want with rachet on the go easily.
 
I had another look at your questions and realised I should have added that I am very happy with the carved minicell foam seat that I put in my wife's guillemot kayak. I would do it again.

Not sure about the tow line question. I know some kayaks come with a built in tow line but I wear my tow line.

Cheers,
Bryan
 
Alright I'm familiar with the bungies on deck to hold things with but the perimeter lines I'm not familiar with. Do they serve as tow lines? Lines to grab onto after you have exited the boat? Just what is their function/s?

Also Toggles? Are they those carrying handles fore and aft?

And the closures for hatches, are they all created equal or are some better than others?
 
Teach said:
Lines to grab onto after you have exited the boat?
This. Perimeter lines must not be bungee cord -- it should be a non-stretching cord. It is vital to your safety to never be separated from your boat should you capsize (slight wind moves an empty boat fast). Perimeter lines give you something to grab onto easily.

Also Toggles? Are they those carrying handles fore and aft?
Yes, when the boat is empty. Lift by the hull when the boat has gear in it.

And the closures for hatches, are they all created equal or are some better than others?
Use the Pygmy hatches and buckles -- they work -- and they work well.
 
Teach said:
Also Toggles? Are they those carrying handles fore and aft?

They can be used for that, but a lot of folks carry the boat by grabbing the hull, as mentioned already.

The 'real' purpose of the end toggle is to give you something (besides the deck lines) to grab if you end up in the water. There are rescue scenarios where you and your kayak may be towed (away from a danger) before trying to get back in your boat, etc.

http://www.sherrikayaks.com/2012/04/16/ ... sk-part-i/

http://www.sherrikayaks.com/2012/05/24/ ... es-part-2/

http://www.sherrikayaks.com/2012/06/18/ ... es-part-3/
 
JohnAbercrombie said:
Teach said:
Also Toggles? Are they those carrying handles fore and aft?

They can be used for that, but a lot of folks carry the boat by grabbing the hull, as mentioned already.

The 'real' purpose of the end toggle is to give you something (besides the deck lines) to grab if you end up in the water. There are rescue scenarios where you and your kayak may be towed (away from a danger) before trying to get back in your boat, etc.

http://www.sherrikayaks.com/2012/04/16/ ... sk-part-i/

http://www.sherrikayaks.com/2012/05/24/ ... es-part-2/

http://www.sherrikayaks.com/2012/06/18/ ... es-part-3/

Informative read John thank you. I need more of that kind of thing to educate myself as I only know one kayaker around here and it's not always easy to connect for question and answer periods.
 
Dan I can't help notice the colour of your boat. It seems darker/redder than other Okume I have seen. Also at the bow there is a short section seen on the deck of what might be about 10 inches that is darker than the rest of the deck.

Did you do some decorative staining? Or is that spliced in wood of a different color?

Lastly.......is that a Pygmy?

Teach
 
Whidbey said:
Dan, How did you finish off the ends of the bungie cords to prevent fraying?
James, I cut the cord with a knife and pulled the outer nylon sheathing slightly past the inner rubber core -- I then used a Bic lighter to carefully melt a bit of the extended nylon sheathing. It worked great and in six years of tugging and abuse, it hasn't failed.

To join the ends of the cord together, I merely tied the ends together with a couple of half hitches. Some times the best way is the simplest.
 
I'm aware of 3 ways to prevent fraying:
1. Dan's method - his technique of pulling the outer sheath past the core before melting is probably crucial for the job to last.
2. Whip the end with a fairly fine waxed whipping twine - doesn't take all that long and looks quite nautical
3. Dip the cord end in a so called whipping liquid - I've not tried such; has anyone?
 
Of the above three methods of finishing a line I prefer whipping. When done properly it will usually outlast the line itself that is to be whipped.

Tandy Leather Products used to sell artificial sinew and you could get it in nuetral (a tan color) or black. And it could also be had in waxed or non waxed. For whipping the waxed is to be preferred. It now appears only the tan color is available.

http://www.tandyleatherfactory.ca/en-ca ... 08-00.aspx

Heavy waxed thread could also be used but I would think it would be more suseptable to abrasion. You could also try a heavy waxed string like a butchers cotton string that they use to tie roasts and such together.
 
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