Necky Thigh braces?

SZihn

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Jul 1, 2021
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Shoshoni Wyoming
In my Necky Chatham17 my thigh hooks seem to hook downward too much My legs are large in diameter so the hook hit me mid thigh instaed of going over the curve. Are there any replacement braces that are longer side to side that wound put all the pressure at a sharp point at 12:00 on my thighs? Even braces that go straight inboard with no downward hook would be OK.
 

CPS

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Oct 27, 2020
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BC
Can you post a picture of what you've got?

Necky had removable thigh braces in some models, in which case you could swap out with a carved piece of minicell foam.
 

rider

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Jul 12, 2005
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Coquitlam,BC
If it's a plastic Chatham, they are removable and if so inclined, it's easy enough to make your own out of aluminum, shaped however you like and then add some foam for padding.
 

mick_allen

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May 15, 2005
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I've used a heatgun with the [cheap to me, plastic] yak upside down for gravity effects to reduce thigh hooks - it wasn't pretty, but the idea worked.
 

SZihn

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Shoshoni Wyoming
CPS, I have a camera but I have a lot of problems with getting the pics from the camera to the computer and then from the computer to a site. So I can try, but I don't know if I can post pics or not.

Rider, it is a plastic Chatham17. I thought of making them from aluminum angles and screwing thin wood to them, then gluing the foam to the wood. Not hard work, but can takes some time which is why I thought I'd ask if there was something already available.

Mick Allen, are you saying I can heat the ones I have and bend them to have less hook? I would not want to ruin them, but I never thought of heating them to bend them. How hot do I need to make them and what's the best way? I could place them in the oven at what....250 degrees? I have no experience with this kind of thing and because Necky is not in business anymore I am hesitant to risk ruining any parts. The radius in the hooks is just too small for me. My thighs measure 23" in diameter 3" above my knees, and the hook looks like it would fit something about 16" in diameter.
 

JohnAbercrombie

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Rider, it is a plastic Chatham17. I thought of making them from aluminum angles and screwing thin wood to them, then gluing the foam to the wood. Not hard work, but can takes some time which is why I thought I'd ask if there was something already available.
I've glued foam to aluminum successfully with solvent-type contact cement. Scuff up the aluminum with coarse sandpaper first.
My thighs measure 23" in diameter 3" above my knees
:eek: :thumbsup:

Impressive, even if it's circumference, not diameter!
:)
 

mick_allen

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are you saying I can heat the ones I have and bend them to have less hook?
It might depend on the plastic if it is still reliably heat deformable

I would not want to ruin them
Don't do it then. I didn't care [cheap $150 fully outfitted, plastic dagger crossfire] and wanted to see what would happen and how I would do it. Basicly took the heat gun and waved the heat all over a hook until all of a sudden [I probably wasn't paying early attention] it all got very droopy and was sorta beyond control. I had the boat right side up and was wearing leather work gloves but basicly blew it as far as any kind of acceptable job is concerned.
If I was to do it again, I'd do it upside down, have a makeshift form it could droop into, and heat it slower - or at least check it better.
 

JKA

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Jul 25, 2016
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166
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Banks Peninsula, New Zealand
I don't have your thighs, but I also found the factory braces in my plastic Chatham very uncomfortable.

I removed them and replaced them with plastic thigh braces from an older-style white water kayak that I had lying around. They were designed to fit into the curves inside the cockpit rim and were one piece, wrapping around the front. Similar to the ones shown here: http://q-kayaks.co.nz/accessories/seat-and-backret-parts/

As the cockpit shape was different I cut out the front part, leaving the sides as separate pieces. I then bolted them through the deck and they worked perfectly.

I'm not sure how you'd be placed getting some, as most modern white water boats now have built-in thigh braces.

May be worth looking around for some, rather than trying to make something from scratch.
 

rider

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Rider, it is a plastic Chatham17. I thought of making them from aluminum angles and screwing thin wood to them, then gluing the foam to the wood. Not hard work, but can takes some time which is why I thought I'd ask if there was something already available.
Rather than pre made angle aluminum which is typically a stiff grade that doesn't like to bend much, i found good success with buying thick aluminum sheet(of the bendable grade of aluminum) and then cutting and bending into desired shape. Foam will stick to bare aluminum fine btw.
 

SZihn

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Jul 1, 2021
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Shoshoni Wyoming
Kayak Jim makes a good point about having nothign to loose if I am going to make new ones anyway.

Rider, I have tried to glue things to aluminum in the past and most times the glue turned loose after some use. But I expect it's because aluminum is so thermo-reactive, and in the case of foam, the bond would not break loose because the foam is neither strong or rigid. So I can see your point and I believe you are right. I had just never done that before.
So I can see why you'd say gluing to the metal is OK. So what would you recommend? Barge cement? One lady on another forum suggested DAP weldwood cement. In fact, her idea may be the best so far, which is to glue foam into the radius and cut it back later so the hook is gone Foam to Foam.
It's so simple I am embarrassed I didn't think of it. Just fill up the hollow so there is no radius. But with her idea, after it's done, if it didn't work out I can remove the new foam, the old foam and then try heating and bending the poly plastic.

If all that fails I can then makes braces from scratch with aluminum and new foam.
 

JohnAbercrombie

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It's so simple I am embarrassed I didn't think of it. Just fill up the hollow so there is no radius. But with her idea, after it's done, if it didn't work out I can remove the new foam, the old foam and then try heating and bending the poly plastic.
For trial fitting, you can just tape foam in place.
For removing foam glued with contact cement or barge cement, a plastic scraper is useful. I've used a scrap of plexiglas sharpened to an edge on the disc sander for that job.
I have pretty thick foam glued under the thigh areas of the keyhole cockpit in my boats and I've had complaints from larger-legged foks that the foam pushes their legs 'too flat' in the boat - this may be an issue for you so best to just sit in the boat and slide pieces of foam into place before taping or gluing.
BTW, the foam people are talking about is closed cell minicell foam. If you don't have a local source, the foam roofrack blocks are one possibility, the 1/2" foam in 'jigsaw' floor tiles works OK and can be laminated up for thicker pads. Cheap yoga mat foam is good for thin 'covering' foam pieces.
 

rider

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Jul 12, 2005
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Kayak Jim makes a good point about having nothign to loose if I am going to make new ones anyway.

Rider, I have tried to glue things to aluminum in the past and most times the glue turned loose after some use. But I expect it's because aluminum is so thermo-reactive, and in the case of foam, the bond would not break loose because the foam is neither strong or rigid. So I can see your point and I believe you are right. I had just never done that before.
So I can see why you'd say gluing to the metal is OK. So what would you recommend? Barge cement? One lady on another forum suggested DAP weldwood cement. In fact, her idea may be the best so far, which is to glue foam into the radius and cut it back later so the hook is gone Foam to Foam.
It's so simple I am embarrassed I didn't think of it. Just fill up the hollow so there is no radius. But with her idea, after it's done, if it didn't work out I can remove the new foam, the old foam and then try heating and bending the poly plastic.

If all that fails I can then makes braces from scratch with aluminum and new foam.
I have had excellent success with peel and stick foam sheets that I've got at Deep Cove kayak, aka Coast Outdoors these days. Barring that most solvent-based contact cement would work fine. If using peel and stick, leave the surface smooth, if using contact cement, rough it up with 40 grit.
I usually play around with making custom bits before irreversibly changing original parts in case of future resale.
 
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