Pygmy Osprey Double questions

Kault316

Paddler
Joined
Jul 12, 2020
Messages
33
Location
Cultus Lake
I feel like I won the lottery! Thanks to John A for putting me in touch with Doug from Main Island who just sold me his 80% complete Osprey double.
Remaining work
combing, complete hatches (the holes are cut), rudder install, rigging, seats, and final finishing - still a bit daunting after an eleven year hiatus from coho building.
I have two questions for the group
1. This boat did not come with a rudder kit so I am open to any suggestions as to the preferred kit to purchase and install these days.
2. It also appears to be missing bulkheads. Does anyone have any Osprey bulkhead templates or tricks for creating one? Or can connect me to someone who knows about these things.
I'm going to install a center hatch from scratch so I'll need to create another bulkhead and cut a new hole and create the lip for that hole. Any ideas for that would be appreciated.
Cheers
 

mick_allen

Paddler & Moderator
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
3,266
2) bulkheads will be a snap: at the location you want, sparingly hot glue 4 or 5 of vertical wood tabs all around and hot glue a irregular shaped corrugated cardboard shape that fills the interior as best you can. Then just glue [hot or white] long darts all around the shape reaching out and touching the inner surface at each joint and maybe halfway in between at the wider panels.
Voila, take out and connect the peaks and you have a bulkhd shape. There might be rounding at some fillet/joint locations but essentially that's all there is to it.

The reason to take a measurement at halfway pts of wider panels in curved areas is that it is not always a straight line in betweeh the joints perpendicular to 3d curved shapes.

ps - and what a find!
 

Kault316

Paddler
Joined
Jul 12, 2020
Messages
33
Location
Cultus Lake
2) bulkheads will be a snap: at the location you want, sparingly hot glue 4 or 5 of vertical wood tabs all around and hot glue a irregular shaped corrugated cardboard shape that fills the interior as best you can. Then just glue [hot or white] long darts all around the shape reaching out and touching the inner surface at each joint and maybe halfway in between at the wider panels.
Voila, take out and connect the peaks and you have a bulkhd shape. There might be rounding at some fillet/joint locations but essentially that's all there is to it.

The reason to take a measurement at halfway pts of wider panels in curved areas is that it is not always a straight line in betweeh the joints perpendicular to 3d curved shapes.

ps - and what a find!
Awesome trick. Question: by darts, do you mean strips of cardboard that radiate out to the inner hull? Or I was thinking of wooden BarBQ scures Anyway, I think I'm seeing your method.
 

mick_allen

Paddler & Moderator
Joined
May 15, 2005
Messages
3,266
yup, scrap cardboard or thin sticks [stirstick, popsicle stick, scrap stick] 1/2" wide x whatever length cut across the end at an angle and that sharp angle end just touching the panel joints. And just simply glued to the face of the irregular flat cardboard - irregular 'cause why waste time trying to get something close when the 'darts' do all the work. Use white glue or hot glue - thin white glue is virtually instantaneous is thin smear. Lay down on better cardbd template material, connect dots, cut out and modify fit inside yak - then transfer outline to bulkhd material.

Oh yeah, I should add that it would be a good idea to carefully look over the alignment of what you now have as there may be some things a little out of whack . . . and this is a last chance opportunity to readjust if necessary:
- run a line, if you can, from bow to stern [maybe laser if have one] and see if the beam at the ctr of the boat is centred from the line.
- set it up level at the ctr [sheerline to sheerline] and sight the bow and stern and see if twisted from vertical.
- when you take each bulkhead shape, check if from deckpk to keel that each side is a semi-decent mirror of each other.

[some recess thoughts for fun: https://www.westcoastpaddler.com/co...ed-rear-coaming-modification.5428/#post-68842]
 
Last edited:

JohnAbercrombie

Paddler
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
2,667
Location
Victoria, BC
What Mick describes for fitting bulkheads is exactly what I do, too.
:thumbsup:
For rudders: I've used the Smarttrack rudders on several boats I've built and I'm happy with them. They use a coil spring in the blade to keep the rudder 'down' in the water, with a single line to retract. The blades are sold separately from the rudder mechanism; there's a longer blade available which SmartTrack calls the 'Tandem' though it's useful on any kayak to help keeping the blade in the water in waves. They don't work well for boats where the rudder is only used 'sometimes' as they don't stow the blade down on the deck. But I'd think the Osprey would be a 'rudder all the time' boat??
Tom at TopKayaker has given me good service for rudders and other kayak parts.
For rudder pedals, something DIY or buying the footpedals from Stellar would be my preference over the side-mounted Smart-Track 'gas pedals'.
Mac50L has plans for a DIY rudder pedal at:
https://canterburyseakayak.wordpress.com/rudder-pedals/
 

Kault316

Paddler
Joined
Jul 12, 2020
Messages
33
Location
Cultus Lake

Kault316

Paddler
Joined
Jul 12, 2020
Messages
33
Location
Cultus Lake
yup, scrap cardboard or thin sticks [stirstick, popsicle stick, scrap stick] 1/2" wide x whatever length cut across the end at an angle and that sharp angle end just touching the panel joints. And just simply glued to the face of the irregular flat cardboard - irregular 'cause why waste time trying to get something close when the 'darts' do all the work. Use white glue or hot glue - thin white glue is virtually instantaneous is thin smear. Lay down on better cardbd template material, connect dots, cut out and modify fit inside yak - then transfer outline to bulkhd material.

Oh yeah, I should add that it would be a good idea to carefully look over the alignment of what you now have as there may be some things a little out of whack . . . and this is a last chance opportunity to readjust if necessary:
- run a line, if you can, from bow to stern [maybe laser if have one] and see if the beam at the ctr of the boat is centred from the line.
- set it up level at the ctr [sheerline to sheerline] and sight the bow and stern and see if twisted from vertical.
- when you take each bulkhead shape, check if from deckpk to keel that each side is a semi-decent mirror of each other.

[some recess thoughts for fun: https://www.westcoastpaddler.com/co...ed-rear-coaming-modification.5428/#post-68842]
Thanks. Any suggestions for sourcing some plywood for these new bulkheads?
 

JohnAbercrombie

Paddler
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
2,667
Location
Victoria, BC
Thanks. Any suggestions for sourcing some plywood for these new bulkheads?
If you have epoxy and fiberglass you can use anything you can get your hands on: doorskins, luan plywood? Once both sides are glassed with epoxy they will work; no need for marine grade. Strip kayak builders sometimes glue up a panel of strips and glass that. Or you could just lay up glass panels with epoxy and glass cloth, which is more expensive but works just fine.
I've seen kayaks where the builder found flat fiberglass panel material at a building supply- there are lots of possibilities.
As long as the bulkhead is properly installed with good epoxy fillets on both sides, you will be fine.
 
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