Replacing footpeg rail stud

JohnAbercrombie

Paddler
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
2,690
Location
Victoria, BC
I like thru-bolts for mounting footpeg rails. They are simple, and if you want to remove the footpeg rails to use a bulkhead footboard, it's easy to plug the holes.
Also, if you are paddling up to a capsized kayak, it's easy to tell which end is the bow, by looking for those machine screw heads near the seam tape.

A friend brought a Zegul kayak over to my shop today. It's amazing all the ways that things can break. :)
The stud which was glassed to the inside of the hull had snapped right where it was welded to the mounting plate.
mini-DSCN4705.JPG


First step was some careful grinding with a small flap wheel and a Dremel.
mini-DSCN4709.JPG

Then with some scraping with a pointed carbide scraper, the old stud plate could be removed.
After cleaning up the area, I could tack the new stud in place with some QuikWood epoxy putty. (I mounted the new stud to the footrail and used that as the locator.)

mini-DSCN4712.JPG


Then it was just a matter of new thickened epoxy and glass cloth over the stud plate, with PeelPly to make later sanding unnecessary.
mini-DSCN4719.JPG


Ready to get the footrail and get outta here! :)
mini-DSCN4723.JPG


It's nice when the parts box has just what is needed.
:thumbsup:
Boat is ready for a rolling practice session tomorrow.
 

JohnAbercrombie

Paddler
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
2,690
Location
Victoria, BC
Stress holes through the hull -
Stress holes?? What's that?

You've said your boats are just painted plywood without epoxy or glass, it's probably best to minimize the number of through-holes. Even in wood-core glass boats, it's a good idea to 'line' any holes with epoxy, which can be tedious work.

You don't use commercial side-mount footpeg rails anyway, do you?
 
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Mac50L

Paddler
Joined
Aug 18, 2014
Messages
276
Location
South Island, New Zealand
Paddling around Alaska is still one of those 'ultimate challenges', I think.
Paul Caffyn gave a talk on his trip round Alaska and ending up in Inuvik. There were about 35+ people at the talk. This is in New Zealand. I pointed out at the end of the talk, during question time, that there were two people in the room who had been to Inuvik though not by kayak. Considering that Inuvik is the back of nowhere, that is typical of people from this country (NZ).

The other person who had been to Inuvik, I paddle with and she built her own kayak. I was either trekking the Himalayas or paddling 38 days round Vanua Levu, Fiji at the time of her Alaskan trip. Note - she also trekked over the Chilkoot Pass on that trip.


I apologise for getting off the fibreglass and bolts subject.
 
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