Rudder Deployment Rope Knots

JohnAbercrombie

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Dec 7, 2011
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Where in the arrangement would a bungee be placed?
There's quite a bit of info here at WCP on rudders - if the forum search function doesn't deliver, you can use Google search, adding site:westcoastpaddler.com to your search string.
This thread shows how I made a simple change to a Seaward rudder setup, changing the location of the shock cord and putting a plastic bead in the line.
https://www.westcoastpaddler.com/co...de-in-the-water-ideas-please.8902/#post-94613

You can order the Clamcleat (which Seaward had installed) online at sailing supply places like The Chandlery in Ottawa.
If you decide later that you don't want to use the cleat, the holes you drilled can be sealed with small SS machine screws - not a big deal IMO.
It's still possible to break a rudder if you run backwards into something, but having a spring (SmartTrack rudder) or shock cord in the system helps to keep the blade in the water (vertical!) and allows you to cruise over kelp without having to manually pull the blade down again.

BTW, if you do change the rudder deploy line(s) consider making the deck safety line and the rudder line different colours. Swimmers seem to grab rudder lines often during rescue practice.

A lot of factory rigging is IMO just a starting point for the boat owner. :)
You'll notice that the Seaward kayak in that thread didn't have deck safety line(s) at the stern. :thumbsdown:
 
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CPS

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Oct 27, 2020
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BC
On my Necky it's got static line for most of the rudder haul line, but a short section (maybe 2 feet?) of bungee where it goes through the padeye. The rudder it tied to the static line with some nice meaty knots. Pull whichever is farther back to the front to toggle up/down. A cleat is nearby to secure the line and thus keep the rudder down.

boat_003.jpg


This photo (not mine) shows the arrangement pretty well.
 

JohnAbercrombie

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Dec 7, 2011
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If there's already a jam cleat (they only work in one direction; I'm assuming it jams to hold the rudder down in the water) then putting a length of 1/4" shock cord in the section between the cleat and the rudder on the 'deploy' side will provide elasticity to let the rudder blade ride up -and down- over kelp and rocks. At the forward end of that line loop, is the shock cord just there to add friction and take up the slack?
 
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CPS

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Oct 27, 2020
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I think taking up slack is a nice side effect of the shock cord. But generally if you pull the one side tight and cleat it, the other side stays a bit loose. Although my shock cord isn't the most youthful, and could probably stand to be replaced.

I can try taking pictures of the arrangement on my boat if needed.
 

Mac50L

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Aug 18, 2014
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South Island, New Zealand
The pull-up, pull-down lines can be 2 - 3 mm line, one each side of the cockpit. One is up, the other is down, no confusion.

If the pull-down line comes to about your mid cockpit or possibly a bit forward of that and with something shaped like a short length of dowel with the line through the middle of it (crosswise). A small holder, block of wood, attached to the deck with a hole through it for the bungy.

The double pronged hook is attached to the bungy which can be inside small diameter tubing running forward, possibly with the far end about the fore hatch. The tubing to allow the bungy free stretch without gear lying on it and stopping its stretch. The dowel gets dropped into the double pronged hook which is attached to the pre-tensioned bungy. Rudder tries to come up when hitting something and pulls the hook aft, increasing the bungy tension. The kayak passes over the object and then the rudder gets pulled back down.

Our rudders are the 90 degree stow type, daggerboard rudder, designed and on the market a decade before KajakSport put their ones on the market and two decades before the Americans, Sea-Lect Designs, patented their version.
The weight is enough to keep them down though I usually rig a bit of bungy on the lower edge of the blade holder.
 
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