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Sleeping pads

mac

Paddler
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
35
Location
Esquimalt
Could you please give me some comments and ideas on sleeping pads/mats. How are the Exped down mats or the Big Agnes rem sleep pads primal loft?
 
My gf has the Big Agnes Primaloft. i tried it and to be honest its not my style. too air-matress like for me,i like firmer. To boot, her's developed a slow leak and i honestly cant think of what couldve possibly punctured it since we're both pretty meticulous about having a clean tent and no sharp stuff . I remember at the MEC gear swap meet, they were selling off their Prima Loft mats,identical to the one Kim has and the store woman said they all have fixable leaks. On the bright side they roll up really small.
I use a Pro Lite 4. Got her to get me one for my birthday because i couldnt justify buying one. It's comfy and its the only thermarest i can think of that folds in half width wise. Though really theres nothing fancy about it, just the foam is full of star shaped holes. boo hoo that sure justifies the price tag. I stick to foamies for backpacking, ProLite 4 for kayaking. my newest addition is a 5mm Evazote 3/4 length foamie that i use as a lay-down-on-the-beach pad and will use under the ProLite 4.
 
mac said:
Could you please give me some comments and ideas on sleeping pads/mats. How are the Exped down mats or the Big Agnes rem sleep pads primal loft?

Personally, I don't like the ones that you have to inflate using the stuffsack. It's a pain in the but. If your sleeping bag is warm enough, you won't need fancy down or primaloft underneath.

I prefer the good ole thermarests. If you are kayaking, get the biggest and puffiest most comfy one that fits in your hatches. If you are doing other stuff (mountaineering or hiking/biking), the pro-lite series is great - even in the snow with a thin foamy underneath.

Traditionally, the thermarest pads are easier to repair because the leaks are more easily found (spray bottle with soapy water).

j
 
Yup, I'm a big fan of the Thermarest as well -- I've been sleeping on them since the '70s and never once had a bad nights sleep on one.

I also agree with jagir -- get the most comfortable one that you can get through your hatches -- I recently picked up some Thermarest Trail Comforts (they're 2" thick) and am quite pleased that I did -- they're incredibly comfortable.

btw: welcome to the site, jagir.

*****
 
On the www.thermarest.com web site, the sizes I was thinking about are the regular 20in x 72in and the large 25in x 77in. I tried the regular, when on my back, my arms are off the mat. What is an average size that paddlers stuff into their hatches. The large looks a bit too big to stuff in a hatch.
 
mac said:
On the www.thermarest.com web site, the sizes I was thinking about are the regular 20in x 72in and the large 25in x 77in. [snip] What is an average size that paddlers stuff into their hatches. The large looks a bit too big to stuff in a hatch.
With mongo hatches, any will fit. Used a shorter, thinner one (20 x 48 x 1 inch thick) for years, but got seduced by a 25 x 72 inch monster that is a full 2 inches thick, and I can't go back. The latter barely fits in a rear hatch, but it is a struggle. In our double, we deck-load a pair of these monsters in a dry bag, between cockpits. We look goofy on the water, but smile and sleep well in camp.

The real drawback to the large pad when soloing is it chews up so much cargo room, I can't take it on week-long trips (I don't like to deck-load a single, for safety reasons).
 
Hi Mac and Astoriadave,

I hear you on the need for comfort, especially as bones get older. My wife and I used to use Thermarest Megarest LEs (no longer made). They wouldn't fit below decks even in our enormous double (the Easy Rider 22'6"), so they rode like drybagged saddlerolls lashed between the cockpits. We put up with that because they made our Wanderer 2 tent wall-to-wall cushion.

Last year we upgraded to a pair of the BA 25" x 78" x 2.5" http://www.bigagnes.com/str_pads.php?id=ia
Same area coverage, even cushier (I suspect not as much insulation, but that's a non-issue for summer camping). Way more compact - enough that I can take one of these pads when I'm going solo. It's smaller than my previous standard Thermarest. Downside - you do need to blow them up, but if you do this on the installment plan as you set up camp (and before supper), it's surprisingly painless.

(Minor conflict to declare - I work for a retailer that sells both Thermarests and Big Anges - but not one you'd be buying from Astoriadave...)
 
kayakwriter said:
(Minor conflict to declare - I work for a retailer that sells both Thermarests and Big Anges - but not one you'd be buying from Astoriadave...)
I'm a MEC member, I think ... and have bought stuff when in Vancouver.
 
D-oh! So look me up next time you're in Vancouver. We can do a evening paddle by Stanley Park and/or hoist a pint...
 
Rider, your mat is probably 20in wide. Like Astoriadave, I would like the 25in. Dan, is your Trail comfort 25in? It was hard to find here. MEC does not have it. Kayakwriter, my yak is low volume so I started looking at the BA and exped blow up mats.
 
My pad is 20 inches wide and I have no problem with it. You can find the Trail Comfort at several of the Broadway strip outdoor vendors in Vancouver -- I'm not sure where you'd find one in Victoria -- try some of the outdoor gear stores.

btw: Dave -- if you get up this way, I'd be into an evening paddle with you and kayakwriter.

*****
 
Dan_Millsip said:
btw: Dave -- if you get up this way, I'd be into an evening paddle with you and kayakwriter.**
Thanks to both of you. I am thrashing through an injured shoulder :cry: , which cropped up in early June, just in time to scuttle my summer ... and my boat building!

I'll hold you both to that promise when I get up there.
 
mac said:
On the www.thermarest.com web site, the sizes I was thinking about are the regular 20in x 72in and the large 25in x 77in. I tried the regular, when on my back, my arms are off the mat. What is an average size that paddlers stuff into their hatches. The large looks a bit too big to stuff in a hatch.
I have the thickest closed-cell Thermarests (the Ridgerest Deluxe) which are 20 x 72 x 0.75.

You can fit exactly two of them side-by side in the aft hatch of a Coho, and they reach from the bulkhead exactly to the fore side of the hatch opening.

(Alternatively, one 20 x 72 will fit in the bow hatch -- probably the best place performance-wise -- reaching from the bow to about three inches past the fore hatch opening.)

But if you like sleeping space, consider buying two of the 20-inchers instead of one 25-incher, because they might take less usable cargo space than one 25 x 72, and give you much more sleep room (40 x 72), expecially if you don't need 77 inches of length.
 
You can trim closed-cell Thermarests to maximize cargo space and fit your sleeping needs.
 
Rootman, Your Ridgerest on the Thermarest web site is listed on the same page as Dan's inflating Trail comfort. The Ridgerest sounds more like the Evazote that Rider has.
 
I used a RidgeRest for quite a few years, including on a few bike touring trips of 2000+ kms each. I finally 'upgraded' to a ThermaRest a couple of years ago. The RidgeRest is almost as comfortable as the ThermaRest Trail R (20" x 72" x 1.25"), but is much less insulating in cold weather. I imagine weight is probably similar but the ThermaRest pads are much more compact when packed (well under 1/2 the size).
 
Mark_Schilling said:
We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails.
Quote attributed to Bertha Calloway
Actually, that quote is Jonathan Swift, I believe.
 
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