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SOF Build

Thanks Dan. Thinking back on those straps. Got them when we purchased our first kayaks. A pair of Necky Manitous, bought from WCK at their Sep. sale in 2005.

So, after a bit of a delay I got back to it. Originally the next step was going to be to dye the nylon skin before applying the waterproof coating. Corey (http://www.skinboats.org) didn’t recommend using the dyes he has for that anymore and instead suggested using rare earth pigments, mixed directly into the polyurethane coating. This is where the delay came in. Ended up finding what I wanted from an art supply store in San Francisco and ordered it from them. After waiting 3 weeks I had to phone and remind them about the order. Another 2 weeks and I finally got them.
Got the kayak set up on the saw horses, hull side up. Mixed the coloring pigment into Part B of the 2 part poly, then mixed up the poly itself and started applying. Little bit of a tedious procedure. You apply 3 coats in total. The first fills in the majority of the nylon weave, then the second and third coats are used to smooth out the surface while building up the material. All three coats are done one right after the other, with minimal waiting between each coat. You pour the epoxy on and then work it around the boat using a plastic squeegee. Gravity is not your friend here. It takes quite some time for the poly to set up so you really have to keep an eye out for runs or sags for a couple hours. The final color didn’t come out quite as dark as I had hoped but still pleased with the result. Tomorrow I can flip it over and do the deck.




Doug
 

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Thanks David. I really didn’t know what to expect before applying this coating. I am happy with the way it came out though. I have noticed there are some areas along the gunwales where the poly hasn’t been built up enough to make a smooth finish like on most of the boat. The nylon doesn’t look starved by any means but it does look like it could use a little more poly to smooth it out. Only problem is after having finished the deck this morning I’ve got no poly left. I would have to get some more sent up from the Skinboat School. I’m leaning towards not worrying about it. Have you come across this before and do you think it will be an issue?



Thanks, Doug
 

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Doug, I only used two-part poly on my first nylon skin boat... didn't get past covering the hull with the amount they gave me, finished the deck in wb lpu, and have stuck with water based polycarbonate ever since. It's not as quick as the two-part, but allows me other advantages, i.e. useing acrylic paint for designwork, easy repair, re-coating every year or two, as I feel the need, etc.
The two-part should be primarily sealed after the second coat, the third is only for gloss and filling, so you should be ok. I used to use this stuff many years ago, when I was working around boats, and at Sea World, and I can attest to it's durability.
 
Hi Jeff,
Still just a decoration in the garage but getting close now. As to how it will roll, I’m pretty confident with the first half, the second half is really questionable (and I’m pretty sure it is going to be more my issues than the boat’s). So it’s down to pretty much deck lines now. How did you do your bow and stern loops? Trying to decide whether to peg them in the gunwales or go right through and knot them up top. I’ve also seen pics where people have drilled down through the upper, outer edge of the gunwales. Any suggestions?
Thanks, Doug
 
Doug, check www.capefalconkayaks.com Brian Shultz shows somewhere on there how he does them, and it's a pretty good method, though I prefer 1/4" black nylon rope, as opposed to his use 0f 3/8"latigo leather. basically, you burn through the skin with a short piece of copper pipe, heated with a propane torch, then drill through the gunwales, and thread the rope through, knotting it on top. I use a fisherman's slip knot, with a simple figure 8 knot locking it all together. A standard greenland rig behind the coaming makes the very best paddle park for a paddle float self rescue you'll ever see, and, in an emergency, you can rig a trimarran with it, using two paddle floats, in a case where you had to be towed, and were unconcious in the boat (God forbid). I use bungee in front, with pad eyes, for whatever, and don't EVER put deck lines on a sof...eeeww :yikes:
Looks great so far, so keep your rigging as simple as possible. :big_thumb
 
paddlesores said:
Any suggestions?
Thanks, Doug

Doug,

I like this stuff. http://www.mcmaster.com/#leather-belts/=albeq5 I use the 5/16 round

I don't peg it. I just drill the holes in the gunnels (it's nice to drill before you skin) to size.
After the skin is on I melt through with a soldering iron and cut the leather belt so the end is pointed
and then push it into the hole with a pliers. For just forward and aft of the cockpit you can reach in and
pull it with only minimum of knuckle banging. For the end's I just push so there is about 2 or 3 inches in
there. I paint a little aqua seal but the leather swells anyway might not need it.

Jeff
 

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Jeff, nice color! what is the coating on your kayak? I'm looking into Grizzly Grip truck bed liner for a WW sof I'm currently sewing, and this has a similar look to that product.
 
I was just able to get the bow and stern loops done this past weekend. Decided to go with the method shown by Brian Schulz (thanks David).
First made some beads from 1” hardwood dowelling and finished them with a few coats of tung oil. Then decided where I wanted the loops to go and drilled the holes through the gunwales. Talk about double checking measurements and placement! That first hole was a tough one to drill. Using a straightened coat hanger I fed the latigo leather through the gunwales. The leather is 5/16” wide and the holes are ¼” so it’s a pretty snug fit and I’ll just use a little marine goop to finish sealing around the straps. Fed the beads onto the lines, knotted them together and then fed the ends of the lines back through the beads again.



Doug
 

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Looks like that works fine! If you had a little longer strip, you could also coat the tag ends with aquaseal, or marine goop, and jamb them back into the holes with a small screwdriver, putting rough surface to rough surface, and effectively sealing the holes, but a drop of water is usually enough to swell the latigo enough to make an effective seal.
 
That would finish it off a little nicer David. The reason I left it the way it is was so I could adjust them later on, fairly easily, if I thought they were too tight or loose. My father-in-law was good enough to cut me a lot of this latigo so I do have extra and may go back and do that once I know what length is going to work best for me.
This past week I finished the boat. I ended up having Corey send me up some more poly and I went over the areas on the deck I thought needed to be built up a little more and also applied a liberal amount to the seam area. I then figured out where I wanted my deck lines to go and drilled out the gunwales for the leather strips. Made up the toggles from pieces of oak finished with tung oil, and then put it all together. Flipped it over and applied a little more poly along the keel and am letting that set up now.
Still waiting for the paddle I ordered so for the maiden voyage I will try to finish off the paddle I started building last summer or just use the storm paddle I built a couple years ago.




Doug
 

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Here are a few pics of the completed kayak. Had it outside this morning so I could clean out the garage a bit and make room to work on the paddle. Just heard this morning that the Greenland stick I ordered is still a few weeks away so will have to get to work on my own for now.




Doug
 

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Stunning. Wanna make one for me? :wink:

Great job, fantastic woodworking, nice tight skin...I love it. :clap:
 
With the finished boat being this nice, I can't wait to see your Greenland paddle.

(bow's low in complete awe!) :clap:
 
Thanks guys, it’s been a fun build.
Here’s a few pics of the paddle so far. I’ve ordered a paddle from Bill Bremer of Lumpy Paddles (http://www.lumpypaddles.com) and we spent quite a bit of time trying to figure out a size that he thought would work best for me. So the paddle I’m building is sized quite differently in order to see how the differences actually feel. My Lumpy Paddle is sized as follows, 86” OAL, 3.5” wide blades, and a 21” loom. The paddle I’m building is 84” OAL, 3.25” wide blades, and an 18” loom. Looking forward to comparing the two in action. The last couple pics are of the paddle wet down, just to raise the grain before final sanding. (I’ll also have to remember not to use a compass to draw the paddle tips with in the future)




Doug
 

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Not to worry about that dimple from the compass.... unless you do use a waterproof finish, like epoxy or varnish (something I'd never do, but some people like), that dimple is gone after the first paddle. Even if you do end up with a "dead" waaterproof finish, you should paddle it once "naked" (the paddle, not you :lol: ) to season it. My finish of preference is Sea FIn teak oil, though even watco makes decent teak oil.
 
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