SOLD! - Valley Nordkapp

Doug_Lloyd

Paddler
Joined
Feb 29, 2008
Messages
580
Used four times locally, so very minor hull scratches. Health forces sale, finally. Bought at Ocean River Sports in 2010 or so, been in garage storage for a long time. New Valley hatches x3 in May 2022. Seat lowered 1/4” with reinforced updated, aluminum hangers. Skeg works great.
Comes with Grey Owl wooden spare paddleand and a Lendal Nordkapp paddle non adjustable.
Kayak is 21” wide, 18’ long, but interested paddlers would probably know all these factors, it being a fast, legendary fibreglass expedition sea kayak from Nottingham, UK.
Adjustable foot rests. Only a few minor issues with boat (small hull dimple from storage strap, cosmetic crack immediately behind aft cockpit keyhole rim, slightly crooked bulkhead install behind seat from factory, and very slight deck gel coat dimpling from protective wrap - nothing that affects functionality).

The included SnapDragon exp neoprene sprayskirt is a tight fit around the keyhole cockpit rim so, not a novice item. The tunnel size is large.

$2000.00 seems a fair to ask for this niche boat.
Located in Colwoo/Victoria, BC

Doug
 

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Doug_Lloyd

Paddler
Joined
Feb 29, 2008
Messages
580
Nordkapp has been lowered to $1700.00 CAD. If the Avocet hasn’t sold you can buy the Nordkapp and Avocet as a package deal for $2,500.00 CAD.
 
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SandMarks

Paddler
Joined
Mar 10, 2008
Messages
76
Location
Costa Mesa, CA
Does this mean the end of a legend's kayaking days?
I haven't been following along for a few years. Moved to Utah and there's no ocean here. I like to think everything on the ocean continues unabated without me!
I hope you are well
Mark Sanders
 

Doug_Lloyd

Paddler
Joined
Feb 29, 2008
Messages
580
Alas, all good things come to an end. We have our memories. It’s been a bit surreal following along on these kayaking sites, getting to know all the personalities, getting great advise, hearing stories…and those long debates like sponsons. Then slowly, our demographic looses paddlers - to health, age, shifts to other pursuits. You see gear and boats go up for sale. Others suddenly gone. Sometimes you mourn, like when Dave from Astoria leaves for those ultimate distant shores or Eric of the Tsunami Rangers looses his final fight, sinking beneath the waves of life. Even the sport of sea kayaking wanes as rec boats and SUP’s pop up everywhere. As Hutchy once said, old sea kayakers never die, they just smell that way. For guys like us Mark, and for all the paddlers that lived life large on the water, we sing along to the refrain, “I did it my way”.
 

kayakwriter

Administrator
Joined
Feb 27, 2006
Messages
1,167
Alas, all good things come to an end. We have our memories. It’s been a bit surreal following along on these kayaking sites, getting to know all the personalities, getting great advise, hearing stories…
I hear you. I'm aging out of multi-week, high-mileage solo voyages. But I'm consoled partially by amazing memories: hearing wolves howl a couple of hundred metres from my tent, whales surfacing close enough to have touched with my paddle, sunsets over the unblocked horizon of the Pacific, remote beaches all to myself, gliding through the cotton-wool world of a sea socked in by fog, and too many more to mention.

My other consolation is this: both formally in my job as a kayak instructor and informally with friends and paddlers I meet along the way, I get to pass on paddling, camping and navigation skills, as a village elder of the sea kayaking tribe. (And there are a gratifying number of younger people interested in long distance touring skills.) Since I'm not religious, I don't expect to be feeling anything after I actually die, but while I'm alive, it does please me to imagine that after I'm dead, there might be the occasional cup of wine from a bag raised to my memory somewhere along the coast.
 

Doug_Lloyd

Paddler
Joined
Feb 29, 2008
Messages
580
I hear you. I'm aging out of multi-week, high-mileage solo voyages. But I'm consoled partially by amazing memories: hearing wolves howl a couple of hundred metres from my tent, whales surfacing close enough to have touched with my paddle, sunsets over the unblocked horizon of the Pacific, remote beaches all to myself, gliding through the cotton-wool world of a sea socked in by fog, and too many more to mention.

My other consolation is this: both formally in my job as a kayak instructor and informally with friends and paddlers I meet along the way, I get to pass on paddling, camping and navigation skills, as a village elder of the sea kayaking tribe. (And there are a gratifying number of younger people interested in long distance touring skills.) Since I'm not religious, I don't expect to be feeling anything after I actually die, but while I'm alive, it does please me to imagine that after I'm dead, there might be the occasional cup of wine from a bag raised to my memory somewhere along the coast.
Exactly. There are those who paddle with much fanfare and those who quietly, humbly leave a legacy of eloquence and pragmatism for others. For all of us in the paddling water tribe, the moments on the water are often beyond superlatives - whether it’s contemplative minutes absorbing the afternoon wind whipping through high coastal treetops as we take a rest break on remote shores or the pure rush with only your skills and experience while rock gardening the outer shores of Solander on a very textured day. For me it was a mixture of it all. And. Existential, always another headland, always planning that next trip, but there is an eternality to it all frankly, we were here, alive, the universe our canopy above, biological creatures with the consciousness to seriously know we are part of something mystical, magical and nuanced. I passed on my love of the sea and nature to my children and I hope they will pass on that passion to my grandchildren.
 

Jurfie

Paddler
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
882
Location
SGIs, BC
Alas, all good things come to an end. We have our memories. It’s been a bit surreal following along on these kayaking sites, getting to know all the personalities, getting great advise, hearing stories…and those long debates like sponsons. Then slowly, our demographic looses paddlers - to health, age, shifts to other pursuits. You see gear and boats go up for sale. Others suddenly gone. Sometimes you mourn, like when Dave from Astoria leaves for those ultimate distant shores or Eric of the Tsunami Rangers looses his final fight, sinking beneath the waves of life. Even the sport of sea kayaking wanes as rec boats and SUP’s pop up everywhere. As Hutchy once said, old sea kayakers never die, they just smell that way. For guys like us Mark, and for all the paddlers that lived life large on the water, we sing along to the refrain, “I did it my way”.
My other consolation is this: both formally in my job as a kayak instructor and informally with friends and paddlers I meet along the way, I get to pass on paddling, camping and navigation skills, as a village elder of the sea kayaking tribe.
And for paddlers such as you - Doug and Philip - and the many others I’ve met on the water or only here on WCP, I am forever grateful. Thanks to Philip taking over the reins of the site, those words of knowledge, encouragement and community will live on here for the next wave who find their way into sea kayaking, or for those who like me have had the flame recently reignited.

Like everything, trends come and go, wane and surge, like the ebb and flow of the tide. I am certain there will be a resurgence of popularity of “proper” sea kayaking, and the years of experience shared here will continue to inspire others, even after those smelly old paddlers have moved on.

Fair seas, Doug; enjoy your time with your grandkids.
 
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