The Kelp Highway...a migration theory ...[from Japan?]

jamonte

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Aug 6, 2015
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In this article, they also mention an archeological site on the Lower Main Salmon River in Idaho. I soloed this section of the Salmon in July, 2018, and while paddling one day, I saw a small white sign down by the waterline. So I paddled over and saw that it was an invitation to visit the archeological dig going on up above. (You couldn't see it from the water.) Once there, I was greeted at the entrance, signed their Guest Book, and was treated to a full tour of the site.

In the Smithsonian article, they call this site "Cooper's Ferry," and there is evidence it was inhabited up to 16,000 years ago. Per the latest migration theory, the Columbia River served as the first major "offramp" from the coastal migration. Fun stuff!
P7060821.jpg
P7060793.jpg
 

mick_allen

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The Cooper`s Ferry dig paper is really interesting:
https://static1.squarespace.com/sta...f2730/1569965214274/Coopers+Ferry+ID.full.pdf

combined with other papers that show that the interior corridor route was not biologically feasible [ no bison in the corridor to eat] until about 12,500 yrs ago, and that many artifacts all over N and S America are older than that, so a coastal route was a most likely route. And with Coopers Ferry artifacts indicating a connection to Hokkaido also c 14,500 yrs ago! Whew, how great!
so the corridor and coastal possibilities:
migration_mapb.jpg

arriving at the Columbia River and to Cooper's Ferry:
ColumbiaRvr-c14000BC.jpg

Connection to Hokkaido:
Coopers-Map.jpg

the artifact comparisons: Coopers Ferry cf Shiritaki Hokkaido
CoopersVsJapan2.jpg


and an overview of the Cooper's site and where jamonte hiked up to:
CoopersSite2.jpg
 

mick_allen

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So the real question for me and probably others here is "what were the boats that the Emishi or Ainu used way back 15,000 or so years ago to make those coastal trips?" Were they a simplified version of the Itaomachip that they used in more recent times up the Kuriles to Sakhalin Is and the Amur River valley?

Itaomachip-Ezo.jpg

[from the book "Ainu-spirit of a northern people"]

And the Ainu had a strong tradition of logboat development from basic dugouts to the fundamental bases for their Itaomachips:
Itaomachip-bases.jpg
 
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